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8 Mindless Habits to Break if You Want to Lose Weight
#11
I hear ya. Weird thing is the neighbors just dropped off a plate of cookies and fudge. Time to "re gift" I guess Wink

Charon, It may be psychological but I have no interest in refined carbs nowadays. I use to be obsessed to the addiction level but with healthy eating the cravings just disappeared eventually. Not complaining.

I would with everyone Merry Christmas, but the corp I work for doesn't allow us to use the term Christmas because it isn't politically correct. We used to have a Christmas break, now we have a "Winter Break." So......Happy FESTIVUS everyone!
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#12
Wow, great topic. Thanks for all the info everyone.

A suggestion for the 9th mindless habit: The Calorie Myth

It's only mindless because ever since the 80's food pyramid(in the US) mentality towards health has been literally brainwashed and programmed into us the Calorie Myth has become just another mindless misnomer. Like "everyone knows the government it here to help you." Hahaha

In brief just indiscriminately eating less calories/fats/carbs to loose weight is not only a flawed concept it can be dangerous. Whole food weight trainers have known this for years, and the science has been available to back it up even longer, but recently a book has been published called "The Calorie Myth," and it explains this concept very well.

A calorie is not a calorie is not a calorie. If you start discriminating and eating the right calories, i.e. from hole natural foods, you can literally eat as much as you want and still loose weight.(Especially if you have the history of eating the wrong calories.)



I am living proof.

(10-23-2015, 11:49 PM)Grandote Wrote: Carog, I agree with that. Refined sugar is a curse upon us and hfcs high fructose corn sweetener is the worst of the lot. We get a bit of sugar in fruits and veggies, even a trace in meat but that won't hurt you. I would say stay away from fruit juice which is going to be mostly apple juice with one or two other things added. The only fruit juice I drink is tart cherry and its like a supplement, it helps me sleep and its very good for you. But avoid added sugars if you want to stay healthy and lose weight.

Grandote, tart cherry helps with sleep? Would you mind providing a more specific anecdote? i.e. does it help getting to sleep, or sleep quality, or both? How much, how often and any brand recommendations would be much appreciated.

Thanks
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#13
I've lost my sweet tooth as well. Used to like chocolate, candy, cookies, etc. I gave them up totally after realising I wasn't very good at having just one piece of chocolate. It seems easier to decline/refuse before you have any, rather than having some and then trying to draw a line.

My tips:

  1. Try to avoid chocolate, candy, and cakes completely. Do not rely on having a small piece and then refusing further servings unless you know you have really strong will power.
  2. Avoid compensatory behaviour. You tell yourself you'll have the donut now and exercise tomorrow - but will it really happen? How hard to you need to exercise to burn all those calories anyway? Could be more than you think... If you have to compensate, switch it around the other way. If you know you have an event to go to, moderate your intake in the days before hand. (But don't skip meals before an event, the food will probably be more calorific and if you drink alcohol on an empty stomach...!)
  3. Food diary. You might be eating more than you imagine. People's recall is notoriously bad. Write it down. All of it - even the little snacks.
  4. Do not diet. A diet is the wrong psychological framework. The psychology of dieting is all about denial. It is also short term and often goal orientated ("I will lose 14lbs before the summer"). Almost all diets fail in the long term (the test is whether the weight is still off five years later). Instead go for a lifestyle change. You are after something permanent that you can sustain. (N.B. There are exceptions to the above, e.g., if you have T2D or a doctor has put you on a rapid weight loss diet prior to major surgery)
  5. Plan your meals. Never go shopping while hungry. Set a budget and buy the essentials first.
  6. If going low carb, give quinoa a try (pronounced "keen-wah"). It is a seed but can be used in place of a grain. It is a complete protein which is unusual in plants, so good for vegetarians/vegans. It is expensive, but remember it is protein and you'll get quite a lot from a 1lb bag. (Wash well before cooking, season with lemon juice or mint to freshen the flavour. Google a recipe - don't just boil it up and expect it to be nice.) If you are rolling your eyes at the thought of quinoa, blame the hipsters for making it fashionable.  Wink
  7. Green tea
  8. Use chilli generously. If your food is well flavoured and you eat it slowly, you will notice yourself consuming it rather than just swallowing huge mouthfuls. Avoid sweet chilli sauce or you'll just be adding sugar. Use real chilli (fresh, frozen, or dried). Do not drown food in yoghurt, cream or cheese to cool down the chilli, that also defeats the point!
Will post others as I think of them. Not all the above are suitable for everyone. Please use common sense.

Er, that's it for now. Good luck!
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#14
icewizzard you always. have an abundance of knowledge. .you amaze me
i only have one vendor and thats D,      moderation can be fatal nothing suceeds like excess , Oscar wilde  Big Grin
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#15
(01-02-2016, 09:44 AM)barq- Wrote: I've lost my sweet tooth as well. Used to like chocolate, candy, cookies, etc. I gave them up totally after realising I wasn't very good at having just one piece of chocolate. It seems easier to decline/refuse before you have any, rather than having some and then trying to draw a line.

My tips:

  1. Try to avoid chocolate, candy, and cakes completely. Do not rely on having a small piece and then refusing further servings unless you know you have really strong will power.
  2. Avoid compensatory behaviour. You tell yourself you'll have the donut now and exercise tomorrow - but will it really happen? How hard to you need to exercise to burn all those calories anyway? Could be more than you think... If you have to compensate, switch it around the other way. If you know you have an event to go to, moderate your intake in the days before hand. (But don't skip meals before an event, the food will probably be more calorific and if you drink alcohol on an empty stomach...!)
  3. Food diary. You might be eating more than you imagine. People's recall is notoriously bad. Write it down. All of it - even the little snacks.
  4. Do not diet. A diet is the wrong psychological framework. The psychology of dieting is all about denial. It is also short term and often goal orientated ("I will lose 14lbs before the summer"). Almost all diets fail in the long term (the test is whether the weight is still off five years later). Instead go for a lifestyle change. You are after something permanent that you can sustain. (N.B. There are exceptions to the above, e.g., if you have T2D or a doctor has put you on a rapid weight loss diet prior to major surgery)
  5. Plan your meals. Never go shopping while hungry. Set a budget and buy the essentials first.
  6. If going low carb, give quinoa a try (pronounced "keen-wah"). It is a seed but can be used in place of a grain. It is a complete protein which is unusual in plants, so good for vegetarians/vegans. It is expensive, but remember it is protein and you'll get quite a lot from a 1lb bag. (Wash well before cooking, season with lemon juice or mint to freshen the flavour. Google a recipe - don't just boil it up and expect it to be nice.) If you are rolling your eyes at the thought of quinoa, blame the hipsters for making it fashionable.  Wink
  7. Green tea
  8. Use chilli generously. If your food is well flavoured and you eat it slowly, you will notice yourself consuming it rather than just swallowing huge mouthfuls. Avoid sweet chilli sauce or you'll just be adding sugar. Use real chilli (fresh, frozen, or dried). Do not drown food in yoghurt, cream or cheese to cool down the chilli, that also defeats the point!
Will post others as I think of them. Not all the above are suitable for everyone. Please use common sense.

Er, that's it for now. Good luck!

Another that would fit nicely on your list is Drink Lots of Water.

As a rule of thumb you are supposed to drink .66 times your body weight in ounces of water a day.

This will not only keep you hydrated, which is key to maintaining optimal health, it will stave off hunger, reducing the craving to snack between meals.

The first and most often mistaken symptom of dehydration is hunger. More often than not when hunger is felt you are actually just thirsty.

In these modern times of sugary caffeinated beverages, dehydration is more wide spread than ever before. The symptoms of dehydration are many, and many would surprise you. Headach? drink water. Dizzy or light headed upon standing? Drink water. Chapped lips? Difficulty pooping? Seizures? Drink water.

Yes seizures are a symptom of dehydration. Someone very close to me was diagnosed epileptic in her early twenties. The docs could not figure out what was wrong, so they drugged her up. The side effects of the pills ruined her life. For over ten years depression, anxiety, panic attacks, and a pervasive and complete lack of will or drive to live crippled her. Even though the dosage was routinely increased the seizures never stopped. Finally with the help of her family she discovered she was, and had been for some time, suffering from severe dehydration. Growing up she just never drank that much, and when she started on the pills she drank even less. For her, not drinking, was a hard habit to break but as soon as she was able to overcome it and hydrate the seizures stopped and she got off the meds. Now her life is great. But for more than ten years it was a nightmare and all because she didn't drink enough water.
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#16
(01-07-2016, 05:23 PM)Lunar Wrote: Another that would fit nicely on your list is Drink Lots of Water.

As a rule of thumb you are supposed to drink .66 times your body weight in ounces of water a day.

This will not only keep you hydrated, which is key to maintaining optimal health, it will stave off hunger, reducing the craving to snack between meals.

The first and most often mistaken symptom of dehydration is hunger. More often than not when hunger is felt you are actually just thirsty.
That is an excellent point.

Water means WATER, not soft drinks - not even the diet ones. Aside from the alledged health issues with artificial sweeteners, the flavour tells your body food is on the way. You are better with regular tap water (unless you live in Flint, MI). I sometimes buy carbonated water because it is a bit more interesting. A slice of lemon or lime is a pleasant addition. A friend of mine loves putting fresh mint in her iced water.

I bought some pint glasses that I fill with water. In the same way smaller plates tend to help people consume less food, larger glasses tend to equate with greater consumption of liquid. (Unfortunately this is also true of wine, which anyone confronted with those huge glasses that hold 1/3rd of a bottle has probably realised!)
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#17
Barq, again, great tips. I struggle with my sweet tooth daily, starting with my morning coffee, and ending with an evening snack. I literally can't sleep without snacking first. Anyone else have this issue?

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#18
Excellent post. I dont struggle with sweets but with PEPSI!!! I guess thats a sweet. I have that issue too Rev. I sleep so much better if I am fat and full LOL! I dont drink milk but I hear thats a good way to fill up and avoid calories!
~Be the Aloha you want to see in the world~
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#19
(02-20-2016, 01:38 AM)Revolution Wrote: Barq, again, great tips. I struggle with my sweet tooth daily, starting with my morning coffee, and ending with an evening snack. I literally can't sleep without snacking first. Anyone else have this issue?

Revolution, JcLnJnngs, When you don't eat for a while do you feel a little nauseous, possibly even some mild stomach pain and to add insult to injury when you actually get around to eating you find the first few bits hard to get down?

Any dizziness when hungry?

How is your mood when you are hungry? Most get a little irritable, but do you feel hunger effects you a little more strongly than most?

Do you feel certain kinds of foods sate your appetite longer than others, regardless of quantity?

I have similar symptoms and I've heard many reasons, but the most likely is hypoglycemia. (I tell myself its a very mild case, although sometimes the first symptom I mentions is quite debilitating.) If there is a quick fix for this I have yet to find it. Basically you just need to watch what you eat, keep a healthy snack on hand and snack often. Also, I'm no doctor but I think avoiding sugary foods is advisable. It sounds contradictory since hypoglycemia is essentially a low blood sugar condition, but consuming large amounts of processed sugar with cause your blood sugar to spike and then after the high wears off it'll dip and then you're twice as miserable.
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#20
Hypoglycemia is really serious, my father suffers from it severely. Going off his diet at all and not replacing a meal with something of similar nutritional value is a disaster for him. All sorts of symptoms =/

My wife and I have helped him fine tune it, and he's been doing a lot better the last four months.
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