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Age and anxiety?
#11
Chinchillin777 - I just don't know how general we can be around with this question of ageing and changes in levels of anxiety.    
Our base-level anxiety is (probably?) determined by what we learned as kids, in what we inherited from our family's genes and from our societal beliefs.
(Let's not even venture into the murky depths of how our microbiome influences our gut/brain axis and our emotional resilience.)

In my family I've watched my Father grow more and more relaxed and happy as he ages, despite physical deterioration that severely restricts his mobility.
On the other hand, I've watched my Mother slide deeper and deeper into depression (with an overlay of generalized anxiety disorder) as she ages.

As for me, I am taking after my Father (and Fishfarmer), generally speaking my anxiety is reducing as I age, accompanied by a growing appreciation for all the good things in my life.
However, I can assure you, that after spending a single hour with my Mother, listening to her bitter complaints about how horrible everything and everyone is; listening to her myopic baseless racist views; her undying support for fundamentalist conservative radio 'shock jocks'.....and every single iota of my peace and tranquility evaporates until I find myself left an angry anxious wreck.  For DAYS.  
(And that's when I'm the most grateful for the relief the b3nz0's provide and their ability to push me into a numb sleep at night until I can regroup and re-balance over the next few days.)

Thank God for neuroplasticity and epigenetics.  Thank God I'm gaining greater insight into this whole thing as I age.
Ask me tomorrow, and I might say something different. Smile Ask me after a visit with my mother, and you'd likely get a VERY different response. Big Grin
'Context', as they say, is Everything.

And I couldn't agree with fishfarmer more. The more empathetic or sensitive type of person you are, the greater the duty is to yourself  to steer clear of energy-vampires and angry negative people and the wicked games they play.
There's a difference between having an opinion and having an informed opinion.
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#12
+ 1 whoever said energy vampires and negativity, id easily say prob 90% people suffer from that single thing another human being that is total drain on one, be it boss at work, someone who you live with , people you have to deal and so on, puts massive strain and for many just thought of encountering them triggers anxiety.Id say it would be fair to say that as humans many of us SUCK big time no respect,kindness some even go as far just to insult you to make you feel worse, to many such encounters in todays life that makes it a misery, that said karma still exists.
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#13
Right there with you Friend! I have been so impressed with the gentle souls who inhabit this site, but I guess some just do not want to get banned. Even if I have a terrible day, which seem to be common these days, I still treat people as I would like to be treated. I think they call that the "Golden Rule"? To those of you in Management positions or Owners, a simple smile or the occasional "Job Well Done" will increase morale 10 fold. Raising ones voice, or not criticizing in a kind and constructive way hurts your bottom line and you lose all respect of your employees. I really feel for those of you who deal with this on a daily basis-Best To You All-FF
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#14
Fishfarmer couldn’t agree with you more about a friendly good job well done compliments in today’s world. So many times it much easier to be nice to other than come across as a ass. I use to run a crew at night stocking groceries and it was a hard crappy job but when I would tell my crew thanks all of you for a great job tonight it showed them I cared and I really did. People now a days have lost that simple good job and thanks you. So sad.


mxray
mxray 
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#15
Diddo FF. The "Golden rule" would make the world a better place. I just visited an old friend of over 55yrs and damn, that family is racist. They listen to nothing but extreme based media. I was invited to stay and visit for an extra day and we declined. Just didn't feel comfortable their, as I'm sure some stupid political argument would break out.

Though I still have a need for benz0s, I can now see what they have taught me. In so many instances I have been somewhere that I needed the bez, but later realized it wasn't as bad as I had imagined. It's all in our heads right Smile. My father who passed away about a year ago seemed to mellow in his later years as well.

Just looking for that sweet spot of an occasional bez0, a productive life and being closer to loved ones.
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#16
Well said Buddy! B's are like a safety blanket for me as just knowing they are there gives me comfort that I can face those kind of situations that bring on anxiety. Bet To You!-FF
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#17
I’ve found that I get more anxious the older I get. I used to be fearless. The big change for me was having children, and having spoken to other people in the same situation that was when it happened to them as well. I think you become more introspective as you age, and all that thinking sometimes isn’t good for you.
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#18
While I applaud people for being able to control their intake of benzos and use them sparingly. Anyone who is on them every day will develop dependence. I don’t believe benzos should be the first line or defense against anxiety and panic other than in a hospital setting. The real problem is that seeing a competent psychiatrist is very very expensive here in the USA since good psychiatrists don’t accept insurance. They want to be paid immediately and you have to hope your insurance will cover the visit afterwords. Psychiatrists that I have been to do not start people on benzos. They really know their meds and try other things first. Or they use benzos only until the other meds they prescribe kick in. I unfortunately for the vast majority of my life was self medicating which led me to be addicted to certain compounds. Stuff like viibryd, inderall and other meds can be so helpful without much sides
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#19
We are lucky to have free medical care here (well not free I suppose as we are paying tax for it ). However waiting lists for psychiatrists are really long and you’d never be able to really time when you need specialist support, which can then lead to self support.
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#20
Excellent feedback and perspectives here!  I had never really thought about how my aging (mid 60's ) was related to anxiety levels.  Richardg...haha!  YES!  I, too, am definitely getting more cranky and less tolerant.  I know what I want from my time and realize what I won't put up with.  I'm learning to enjoy the ride more, wherever it takes me.  Anxiety presents some potholes and bumps, and for those times, my meds provide needed relief.  I rarely drink anymore.  I used to faithfully observe the "cocktail hour" daily, as did my parents.  Over time, I seemed to lose my taste for it, which I attributed to aging, but perhaps the whole anxiety issue is related to getting away from angry, frustrated people, as fishfarmer stated.  Regarding alcohol, I've seen "up close and personal"  the devastating effects of alcohol on some individuals and families.  I'm very careful not to combine it with certain meds I take.  Interesting thread and individual experiences!
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