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anyone else feel stuck in life ?
#11
I know about a bit about anxiety / and or depression.2 open heart surgeries and now a chronic disease that gets me down sometimes and depressed. I was diagnosed 4 plus yrs ago with PAH which they think is the result of these surgeries, the medical community has now admitted that OHS can result in depression so they prescribe a anti-depression for 6 months afterwards

Now that i am older it doesn’t get better. Right now I feel that I am at a crossroads, I am on presquit; Wellbutrin 200 mg and tram one for sleep and Ativan. And of course my perc 10.

I am not feeling normal anymore I am on oxygen at night 6 ml I dont drink. I used to be so full of joy. I cant tell if my PH is getting worse
(2) I dont know if my antidepressants need changing
(3) I am taking to many pain pills as it helps the sternum pain from 2 OHS or is it my PAH getting worse which is causing more antiaxiety

Do anybody here have
Pulmonary Hypertension

Any suggestions
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#12
Hello cmdline. I haven't seen many of your posts but this also sounds like you may be dealing with more than you think. Depression can often manifest like this. I know the feeling, that life has passed you by, that you're too late, that its all over for you. My only word right now is to know that it is never too late to start something. People make second careers later in their life more often than you may think. Do you or have you played sports? They can help if you really get into it. Same with friends, all of them abandoned me and currently have no social life, but it doesn't matter at all, be patient. Be rational, have you really not accomplished much in life? I don't believe this, you probably have done more than you think. The past is the past, no matter how unfortunate it is. Make a new chapter.
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#13
cmdline, HELLO Friend. I can relate completely with where you are at in life! I am 52 and the Fish Biz is breaking me down physically, but I will lay in the bed I made for myself as this is my expertise. Agree with hg as far as a new career is concerned, please do not ignore this possibility! I was eating B's like candy at the last farm just to deal with anger issues and the yelling from the owner. I know a career change is a stressful event, but since my change to a different farm, anxiety has gone from a 9 to a 1 on a scale of 1-10 and do not even take B's everyday to make it. I too am guilty of living the same routine though and as Mom said I should try and become more a part of the community. Have started to go to Church again and hope to get involved in other social activities. Am kind of a Hermit but I believe that there are many good days ahead, if I just take the Damn initiative! I am terrible about change. Bless You Buddy and Prayers and Best Wishes sent your way! FF
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#14
(05-21-2018, 12:59 AM)fishfarmer Wrote: cmdline, HELLO Friend. I can relate completely with where you are at in life! I am 52 and the Fish Biz is breaking me down physically, but I will lay in the bed I made for myself as this is my expertise. Agree with hg as far as a new career is concerned, please do not ignore this possibility! I was eating B's like candy at the last farm just to deal with anger issues and the yelling from the owner. I know a career change is a stressful event, but since my change to a different farm, anxiety has gone from a 9 to a 1 on a scale of 1-10 and do not even take B's everyday to make it. I too am guilty of living the same routine though and as Mom said I should try and become more a part of the community. Have started to go to Church again and hope to get involved in other social activities. Am kind of a Hermit but I believe that there are many good days ahead, if I just take the Damn initiative! I am terrible about change. Bless You Buddy and Prayers and Best Wishes sent your way! FF

+1 FF im making changes in my life, its stressful enough as is when being pushed around by people who have iq of a monkey yet they run the business and you have to listen to them all day long is exhausting when having anxiety.
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#15
I think pretty much anyone with anxiety/depression can look back on their life (if not their present) and point to a time where they felt “stuck”. Often times, the symptoms of depression (and if accompanied by anxiety, even more so) lead to a downward spiral, because you find yourself feeling apathetic, drained, hopeless, and you begin to neglect your various physical, mental, interpersonal, and financial state of affairs to one degree or another. It can be exceptionally hard to “pull one up by one’s bootstraps” as is often suggested by friends/relatives/doctors/on lookers in general. Others understand logically, but only those of us who have been there get what a catch 22 it is.

Honestly, as much as I disagree with the medical establishment - especially in the US, it took seeking professional help from a psychiatrist (whom I didn’t have much hope for). In my case the issue was maybe 60% anxiety, 40% depression, so it’s not exactly the same, though much of the anxiety at the time revolves around the side effects of my depressed state. I personally have not found appreciable clinical value in antidepressants for treating or preventing depression, mostly just side effects, but to each his/her own... I did, however, find value in an off label antidepressant for sleeping purposes, and anxiety medication during the day, which has worked surprisingly well for me over the years since, not nearly as many diminishing returns as I expected from this type of medication.

Obviously things like diet, excercise, and daily routine should be analyzed and altered prior to resorting to pharmacological help, but if you truly feel that stuck, and you can afford it, at least try any medical options available to you, like myself, you may be pleasantly surprised to see that “the system” so to speak, doesn’t always work against you, and can actually give you an uplifting and welcome respite - which is an excellent opportunity to seize and to build upon, assuming your long term goal is not to be able to handle feelings of depression etc. through CBT (cognitive behavioral teqchniques) and other self-driven reflection, discipline, etc. etc.

Best of luck to you all, this word is surely full of its share of trials and tribulations.
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#16
I Am totally stuck. Am in my early to mid 30s, insomnia/depression and anxiety made me drop out of school. I’m totally lost. I take medication to go to sleep. I have horrific anxiety and depression. It’s hard for me to get up and take a shower sometimes. The dr put me on benzos and Zoloft but the benzos are temporariy masking the anxiety but I’m still depressed as shit. The Zoloft hasn’t helped me. I simply can’t go back to school or have a normal job in the condition I’m in. I want to live. I really do. I just don’t know what to do anymore
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#17
(09-24-2018, 04:22 PM)Wannabenormal18 Wrote: I Am totally stuck. Am in my early to mid 30s, insomnia/depression and anxiety made me drop out of school. I’m totally lost. I take medication to go to sleep. I have horrific anxiety and depression.  It’s hard for me to get up and take a shower sometimes. The dr put me on benzos and Zoloft but the benzos are temporariy masking the anxiety but I’m still depressed as shit. The Zoloft hasn’t helped me. I simply can’t go back to school or have a normal job in the condition I’m in. I want to live. I really do. I just don’t know what to do anymore

keep your head up, recently i posted some personal stuff around, i havent been diagnosed but can tell for sure i have anxiety plus seasonal depression that flares up bad, bad as in rage destruction thoughts, my motivation goes from 110 to 0 mood swings etc. Your getting help and you know you have an issue, im against seeing docs as where i live you get bounced like a muppet and costs a fortune, id rather speak with people i dont really know that have more wisdom and went myself out. As getting motivated etc and out from the cloud i cant give much advice, can you take some personal time, holiday or something. I feel often trapped benzos anxiety depression being low achiever no confidence and list goes on. One thing i realized i can do things be happy in my own mind, im different i dont seek goals, hell i even prefer to be single, what gets to me is the society and norms from what others expect you to be and do this totally gets on my gears, we live in such diverse world and culturally we are often fcked > dont want to curse but but this gets me all the time, you should be doing this and that reaching for whatever it is money, better job being model citizen, i just want to explore world have experiences, yes work is part of it, but it doesnt mean i have to be stuck in 9-5 for 40 years until i can retire lookback on all the opportunities i missed instead following someone else ideals what i should done.
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#18
I'm sorry to hear you are going through this, I know exactly what it feels like. The smallest thing like getting up and making tea feels like climbing mount Everest I used to say to my mum.

I used to see a psychologist and she gave me a sheet of paper with ten common thinking mistakes we make. I've lost it but tried to find it on g**gle and it has helped me a lot when ever I feel anxious/or a bout of doubt coming on.

I hope it helps you at all.

1. All-or-Nothing Thinking
Sometimes we see things as being black or white: Perhaps you have two categories of coworkers in your mind—the good ones and the bad ones. Or maybe you look at each project as either a success or a failure. Recognize the shades of gray, rather than putting things in terms of all good or all bad.

2. Overgeneralizing
It's easy to take one particular event and generalize it to the rest of our life. If you failed to close one deal, you may decide, "I'm bad at closing deals." Or if you are treated poorly by one family member, you might think, "Everyone in my family is rude." Take notice of times when an incident may apply to only one specific situation, instead of all other areas of life.

3. Filtering Out the Positive
If nine good things happen, and one bad thing, sometimes we filter out the good and hone in on the bad. Maybe we declare we had a bad day, despite the positive events that occurred. Or maybe we look back at our performance and declare it was terrible because we made a single mistake. Filtering out the positive can prevent you from establishing a realistic outlook on a situation. Develop a balanced outlook by noticing both the positive and the negative.

4. Mind-Reading
We can never be sure what someone else is thinking. Yet, everyone occasionally assumes they know what's going on in someone else's mind. Thinking things like, "He must have thought I was stupid at the meeting," makes inferences that aren't necessarily based on reality. Remind yourself that you may not be making accurate guesses about other people's perceptions.

5. Catastrophizing
Sometimes we think things are much worse than they actually are. If you fall short on meeting your financial goals one month you may think, "I'm going to end up bankrupt," or "I'll never have enough money to retire," even though there's no evidence that the situation is nearly that dire. It can be easy to get swept up into catastrophizing a situation once your thoughts become negative. When you begin predicting doom and gloom, remind yourself that there are many other potential outcomes.

6. Emotional Reasoning
Our emotions aren't always based on reality but we often assume those feelings are rational. If you're worried about making a career change, you might assume, "If I'm this scared about it, I just shouldn't change jobs." Or, you may be tempted to assume, "If I feel like a loser, I must be a loser." It's essential to recognize that emotions, just like our thoughts, aren't always based on the facts.

7. Labeling
Labeling involves putting a name to something. Instead of thinking, "He made a mistake," you might label your neighbor as "an idiot." Labeling people and experiences places them into categories that are often based on isolated incidents. Notice when you try to categorize things and work to avoid placing mental labels on everything.

8. Fortune-telling
Although none of us knows what will happen in the future, we sometimes like to try our hand at fortune-telling. We think things like, "I'm going to embarrass myself tomorrow," or "If I go on a diet, I'll probably just gain weight." These types of thoughts can become self-fulfilling prophecies if you're not careful. When you're predicting doom and gloom, remind yourself of all the other possible outcomes.

9. Personalization
As much as we'd like to say we don't think the world revolves around us, it's easy to personalize everything. If a friend doesn't call back, you may assume, "She must be mad at me," or if a co-worker is grumpy, you might conclude, "He doesn't like me." When you catch yourself personalizing situations, take time to point out other possible factors that may be influencing the circumstances.

10. Unreal Ideal
Making unfair comparisons about ourselves and other people can ruin our motivation. Looking at someone who has achieved much success and thinking, "I should have been able to do that," isn't helpful, especially if that person had some lucky breaks or competitive advantages along the way. Rather than measuring your life against someone else's, commit to focusing on your own path to success.


Fixing Thinking Errors
Once you recognize your thinking errors, you can begin trying to challenge those thoughts. Look for exceptions to the rule and gather evidence that your thoughts aren't 100% true. Then, you can begin replacing them with more realistic thoughts.

The goal doesn't need to be to replace negative thoughts with overly idealistic or positive ones. Instead, replace them with realistic thoughts. Changing the way you think takes a lot of effort initially, but with practice, you'll notice big changes—not just in the way you think, but also in the way you feel and behave. You can make peace with the past, look at the present differently, and think about the future in a way that will support your chances of reaching your goals.

Heart QF
Success!
To laugh often and much, to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children, to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived.
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