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The therapeutic effect of crying
#1
http://www.medicaldaily.com/cry-it-out-6-surprising-health-benefits-shedding-few-tears-333952

Hey all,

Crying is actually beyond therapeutic for me. It's cathartic. It wasn't always like that, though. I can remember many decades ago the American Psychiatric Association finally confirming the healing powers of a good cry, and me thinking that their comments may be psychobabble at the time. But I have come to realize that they were indisputably correct. Not only is there a sound physiological basis for why crying might help, as outlined at the above link, but a sound psychological basis, as well. I have come to use crying as a tool in my arsenal against my own depression. I put time aside for it and purposely induce it, when necessary. I sometimes use music to help me get underway. "Tear's in Heaven" by Clapton, "My Immortal" by Evanescence. "Runaway Train" by Soul Asylum, and "I Don't Love You Anymore", by My Chemical Romance" are a few that I routinely use. Of course, many times I don't need to use anything but reflection on a sad memory or thoughts of human or (particularly) animal suffering and I am off and running. I know that it all sounds quite morbid, but I believe that it's fine to employ these dark thoughts as a means to an end. Using them constructively is different than just wallowing in them. Would anyone like to say if they use crying as a form of therapy and how they help themselves get underway? A favorite sad song? Would love to hear whatever you care to share.
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#2
Sorry My Friend, but could not access link, that said I, a Grown Ass Man have been crying like a baby from time to time and grieving over my Fathers suffering trying to prepare but I don't think you can really prepare for your best friends death. "Tears in Heaven" reminds me of when Dad a devout, but not a judgemental, or Bible thumping Christian visited our old friend Red who was also dying of cancer. Three years earlier he lost his daughter and his his two Grandchildren, ages 3 and 5 in a car accident, and he asked Pa if they will know him in heaven? Not sure what he said but I would bet it helped put our Friends mind at ease. Merry Christmas to you All and my heart goes out to those of you who are suffering!-FF
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#3
(12-23-2017, 02:57 AM)fishfarmer Wrote: Sorry My Friend, but could not access link, that said I, a Grown Ass Man have been crying like a baby from time to time and grieving over my Fathers suffering trying to prepare but I don't think you can really prepare for your best friends death. "Tears in Heaven" reminds me of when Dad a devout, but not a judgemental, or Bible thumping Christian visited our old friend Red who was also dying of cancer. Three years earlier he lost his daughter and his his two Grandchildren, ages 3 and 5 in a car accident, and he asked Pa if they will know him in heaven? Not sure what he said but I would bet it helped put our Friends mind at ease. Merry Christmas to you All and my heart goes out to those of you who are suffering!-FF

Thank you FF, my good friend. I think that it is important for men to admit that they cry. That is one of the reasons that I told of my personal experience with crying and I thank you for doing the same. I think that the body usually knows what is good for it and that may be one of the reasons that we gravitate toward crying during sad situations. We need that release. People always think of it as a bad thing because it's usually associated with something upsetting that has happened. I just wanted to show that it could be put to good use and allow a person to see that they can get that release anytime they need it. Not sure why that link would not work for you...Let me post the article below. for anyone who also has a problem with the link.

Article
We’ve all had a good cry, whether it’s the end of a close relationship, frustration at work, or even a movie. Amid the stream of salty tears sliding down our cheeks, blurring our vision, and making our eyes puffy, we wonder what benefits this state of vulnerability could have on our fragile and delicate psyche?
We produce 10 ounces of tears per day and 30 gallons a year. These tears can either be basal tears, reflex tears, and lastly, psychic, or tears produced by emotion. Although emotional tears do contain higher levels of stress, they have the ability to calm the iris down and signal the emotional state to others.
Sharon Martin, a licensed psychotherapist in a private practice in San Jose, Calif., suggests there are many advantages to having a good cry. “I encourage crying because it purges negative energy and allows for new, positive energy to fill us up. Sometimes people feel embarrassed or ashamed about crying, especially in public. Crying is normal and nothing to be ashamed of,” she told Medical Daily in an email.
It’s time to grab a box of Kleenex, let go of our sorrows, and read the benefits of crying.
1. Releases Toxins
Crying does not only mentally cleanse us, it can cleanse our body too. Tears that are produced by stress help the body get rid of chemicals that raise cortisol, the stress hormone. A study conducted by Dr. William H. Frey II, a biochemist and director of the Psychiatry Research Laboratories at the St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Centre, found like other exocrine processes, including exhaling, urinating, and sweating, toxic substances are released from the body when we cry. Several of the chemicals present in emotional crying are the protein prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormones, and the endorphin leucine-enkephalin, which reduces pain.
2. Kills Bacteria
A good cry can also be a good way to kill bacteria. Tears contain the fluid lysozyme — also found in human milk, semen, mucus and saliva — that can kill 90 to 95 percent of all bacteria in just five to 10 minutes. A 2011 study published in the journal Food Microbiology found tears have such strong antimicrobial powers they can even protect against the intentional contamination of anthrax. Lysozyme can kill certain bacteria by destroying bacteria cell walls — the rigid outer shell that provides a protective coating.
3. Improves Vision
Tears, made by the lacrimal gland, can actually clear up our vision by lubricating the eyeballs and eyelids. When the membranes of the eyes are dehydrated, our eyesight may become a little blurry. Tears bathe the surface of the eye, says the National Eye Institute, keeping it moist, and wash away dust and debris. Crying also prevents the dehydration of various mucous membranes.
4. Improves Mood
Tears can elevate our mood better than any antidepressant available. A 2008 study from the University of South Florida found crying can be self-soothing and elevate mood better than any antidepressant. The shedding of tears improved the mood of almost 90 percent of criers compared to the eight percent who reported crying made them feel worse. Individuals with anxiety or mood disorders were less likely to experience the positive effects of crying.
5. Relieves Stress
A good cry can provide a feeling of relief, even if our circumstances still remain the same. Crying is known to release stress hormones or toxins from the body, and as a result, reduces tension. Martin believes crying is a healthier alternative to punching the wall or “stuffing your feelings,” which can lead to physical health problems like headaches or high blood pressure. “Crying is a safe and effective way to deal with stress,” he said. “It provides an emotional release of pent up negative feelings, stresses, and frustrations.”
6. Boosts Communication
Crying can show what words cannot express, especially in a relationship. This is mostly seen when a person in the relationship is having a different reaction to a situation that isn’t transparent until tears begin to show. For example, “Someone may be trying to play it cool, or hold it together, or be out of touch with emotions — that are suddenly apparent when one person starts to cry,” April Masini, relationship expert and author, told Medical Daily in an email.
It is at the moment one person bursts into tears that the flow of the conversation shifts toward the emotional aspect the conversation was covering. Masini believes “The crying can quell a fight, emphasize a point not gotten across in words, or simply underscore the importance of the feelings behind the dialogue.”
A good cry or two can naturally heal us both physiologically and psychologically. 
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#4
(12-25-2017, 02:47 AM)maldita Wrote: Interesting read. Specific methods to induce crying will be good. I have never been a big crier. I didn’t even cry when my dad died when I was 10.

Onions my friend, cutting onions, believe me, i atleas cry as a baby if i just poke the onion.  Big Grin
Don't gain the world and lose your soul; wisdom is better than silver or gold.
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#5
I have been saying for years that tears contain cortisol, even though I had no idea where I heard that, so great to get some validation, RF.

So not actually cortisol but the chemicals that raise/increase it - good enough for me.

Great article RF, thanks for posting.
Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. There's not some trick involved with it. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals, it communicates and does all these incredible things. Tom Petty
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#6
(12-25-2017, 03:03 PM)FirePlaces Wrote: I have been saying for years that tears contain cortisol, even though I had no idea where I heard that, so great to get some validation, RF.  

So not actually cortisol but the chemicals that raise/increase it - good enough for me.

Great article RF, thanks for posting.

My pleasure, Fire. Thank you for your kind comments, as always. RF
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#7
THIS is a great article !
I always wondered the reason why after a good cry
you just feel this "relief". Now I know.
I must cry more!  But happy tears if I can...
Big Grin
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#8
Howdy Mikka,
I am glad that you brought that up. I meant to include crying out of happiness in my original post! I believe that has an equally therapeutic effect. So much nicer to think on happier things when trying to bring on the tears.
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#9
(12-29-2017, 12:46 AM)Rafterman Wrote: Howdy Mikka,
I am glad that you brought that up. I meant to include crying out of happiness in my original post! I believe that has an equally therapeutic effect. So much nicer to think on happier things when trying to bring on the tears.

Hey there Rafterman!

Yes, the crying for happiness is great but unfortunately THAT doesn't happen
near as often than the sad kind...
In general, I always hold back the tears for whatever, but after reading
that... I'm gonna allow myself to do so.   Shy
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#10
Thanks for all the thoughts on the therapeutic benefits of crying, folks. Also, thanks, men, for opening up about a topic that seems to be difficult for some 'merican men to talk about. I can't say for sure, though, I'm not a man. But, I like to learn about what men can teach other men (and women) about their own experiences with the crying and its helpfulness. Thanks for being brave, guys!
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