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FCC Passes New Net Neutrality Regulations - Will it Affect the IOPList?
#1
Well, my personal opinion is that the answer is no. Sure, I don't like reading "FCC" and "New Regulations" in the same sentence, but from what I have read its the big media corporations that could potentially face limitations on growing their businesses due to Net Neutrality Regulations. On the surface, and keep in mind that the actual regulations have not yet even been published in the CFR, it appears that these Rules will prevent fragmentation of bandwidth based on who is willing to pay more for bandwidth fast lanes. The TV streamers and online gamers are sucking up a lot of bandwidth every day, and you are wrong if you think that you are unaffected by these bandwidth hogs in terms of your personal use.

I found this article in USA Today to be a good FAQ regarding Net Neutrality. See:https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015.../23237737/

Net Neutrality, as I understand it, would prevent bandwidth from being doled out to those who are most willing to pay for it. Google and Apple oppose this model for the internet and I applaud their position on this matter. Others, such as Verizon and Comcast see this as a limitation which will prevent them from growing their revenue by selling extra bandwidth to those willing to pay.

Right now, internet bandwidth is available on a first come - first serve basis. Nobody owns shares of bandwidth, and it can't be bought and sold - thus the openness of the internet. Net Neutrality supports this model. That sounds good to me, what do you think?

I look forward to listening to your comments.
Raven
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#2
Anytime the big footprint of ours are anyone's gub-mint starts treading lightly "in the name of YOUR protection" ..., Then is on to our own children's safety .... and then from then on out, there will be no neutrality....

Ice
A true friend, freely advises,
justly assists readily, 
adventures boldly, 
takes all patiently,
defends courageously
and continues a friend unchangeably.


William Penn


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#3
Good thread Raven. Hi Ice!

Ok so let me make sure I have this straight. The FCC is in support of net neutrality? The new regulations state that an ISP can not sell faster access?

Do I have that right?
Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. There's not some trick involved with it. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals, it communicates and does all these incredible things. Tom Petty
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#4
The FCC WAS in support of neutrality under Obama...the recent changes do not support neutrality.

Although it seems to be about money....the real world problems will be about "favoritism".
Some sites easily seen now may be much more difficult in the future. This will have serious political, educational and freedom of speech ramifications.

THIS IS DEFINITELY NOT GOOD....all of the biggies (Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, News organizations and on and on) support neutrality.

Imagine Comcast deciding what we can easily access or NOT.
Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence - Desiderata
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#5
Thanks Pops.

I think I understood in my heart. Was just hoping that maybe for once the news was not bad.
Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. There's not some trick involved with it. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals, it communicates and does all these incredible things. Tom Petty
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#6
This website should not at all see any difference what so ever, it is more about having monopolys over lines, and small isps trying to survive because the big wigs will charge whatever they want to them, because they can, and there trying to find middle ground. but this website will see absolutely no change, your internet price, that's what I would be concerned about. bandwidth is not a issue, they act as if it is, they want people to pay there fair share vs. everyone pays evenly. like saying should google pay more for there traffic then this website,? yes they should because they devour bandwidth this site is 1 millionth of that website if that. so its just kind of completely unrelated and nothing to worry about.
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#7
So, is my understanding of the current bill correct Popster?
Thanks
Blackbird
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#8
I agree with Popster that this isn't good, but also Mapurv in the sense it won't affect this website. It just isn't high enough bandwidth to get caught up in that. Furthermore, I have no reason to believe this website is even hosted in the USA.

Changes to net neutrality will have consequences beyond the USA, since I believe the EU could possibly follow in the same direction.
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#9
(12-19-2017, 02:14 AM)Raven Wrote: So, is my understanding of the current bill correct Popster?
Thanks
Blackbird


Yes, I think you do have the general idea Raven.
So does barq and Mapurv.

This site won't be affected and most small users will not be affected financially...except by paying more for sports and entertainment accessed via the Internet.

Just think of countries like China, or Iran, or Russia or North Korea that try to control what can and cannot be seen by their citizens.

Companies like Netflix are going to get hit hard and customers will be paying more for video/media services.
There is the threat of monopoly.

It remains to be seen, but I believe a kind of censorship (via bandwidth allocation) may very well be a result....and that is our biggest threat.
With neutrality gone, there will be more gov't involvement...i.e. regulations.

It's all conjecture at this point...but it is also clearly about money and power.
Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence - Desiderata
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#10
It will be interesting to see how this all unfolds.
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