Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Anxiety-related muscle twitches. Does anyone get them?
#11
(01-12-2018, 12:07 AM)maldita Wrote:
(12-05-2017, 02:10 PM)Rafterman Wrote: Hey all,
I am not taking about cramps, but instead those little high-speed twitches that one may sometime get on their eyelid when stressed. Does anyone here get them
anywhere else? My wife suffers from these on her quads and upper arms, and she is about to jump off the roof because they can sometimes indicate serious disease. Technically known as "fasciculation's", some people get them from working out too hard, stress, or tapering off any psychoactive med. Some other's experience them when on an ATD. None of those apply to my wife right now. I have suffered from them for quite a while now, but I do have motor-neuron disease and that is what is freaking her out. She is afraid that she might have it, too. I told her to stop worrying. Those group of diseases are classified as "extremely rare", affecting 1 person in every 50,000. I got mine through excessive exposure to environmental toxin's. She has never been exposed to anything like that. With her, it is probably a case of benign fasciculation  syndrome...which is a well recognized phenomenon affecting those in the medical field. She has tried increasing and decreasing her magnesium, calcium, potassium and b-12 intake. Nothing slows them down. In any event, stopping them is secondary. Her primary worry is with regard to what made them start in the first place.
SO, I promised her that I would post on here to see if anyone is suffering from them, and any further details that that person would care to share. Thanks for reading.  Peace.  RM

I am so sorry to hear about her problem. I get twitching on my thighs/knees/legs. I call them spasms. It's weird to see it move. My old GP saw one video I took and that's when I got prescribed valium or clonazepam to help relax. I go through periods of this. I quit caffeine because the doctor told me to but it did not really help. I just think it is myoclonus. It doesn't hurt but it is annoying. However, I did have a colleague who suffered from Earl Grey tea intoxication. I think his twitches were worse than mine.

I do hope she gets some tests done to do a differential diagnosis and find out what is wrong. Hugs to both of you.

Right back at you, Maldita! You are very nice. I told the wife what you said. She deals with myoclonus in her job. She has a family history of that, but not of the fasciculation's....which usually present as quick, fine, partial spasms.. looking like shimmering snakes under the skin. Really unmistakable. Would you say that yours are like that, when you have them? She was okay with the myoclonus, but the fascic's are really scaring her. She is being worked up by two different sets of doctors. There can also be a possible psychological aspect to it, too. Like a conversion disorder. This may stem from the fact that she sees what I am going through and her mind can't deal with it. Anyway, thank you again!
Reply
#12
(01-13-2018, 02:22 AM)maldita Wrote: Rafterman, my fasciculations are definitely different and more of an annoyance unless my pain is really bad. It is a difficult situation to be in. My dad-in-law had ALS and I took care of him so I can understand the difficulty. More hugs from me.

Thanks again, Maldita. your father-in-law was really blessed to have someone like you to care for him. People usually run for the hills when they hear that someone has this disease. Even the strongest people can't handle it. It is hard enough to be a caregiver to anyone who has any major disease, but caring for an ALS patient brings special challenges. You must be a very strong woman, emotionally speaking, and quite selfless. Its hard enough for a wife to care for her husband, but a woman caring for an in-law in that situation is extraordinary. God bless you.   RM
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)