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ORBERA BALLOON and Eating for comfort, vs true hunger
#11
I know a guy that had the reducing the size of the stomach via surgery.
I just know of him was not really friends with him but I did talk upon occasion.

He lost weight and then had hanging skin and had to have surgery to correct that.

So it can work.

Sometimes people struggle so much with weight. I know it. And to others it seems like no biggie just stop eating so much, but really I realize it is not that simple.

I am glad I have never had to deal with it.

We all seem to have something though, so .....

 If you get tired, learn to rest, not to quit.
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#12
(11-26-2017, 11:23 PM)Audrey Hepburn Wrote: Is it possible she had the surgery reversed and gained the weight back?

Frankly, If we are talking ethics, I don't feel comfortable judging/"analyzing" people that aren't here to defend themselves, or to give facts and insight about choices they made.

I see your point regarding the ethical considerations of discussing people who aren't here. I was simply relaying the only personal experience I have with this area. I guess it did come across as a bit "judgy." Blush
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#13
(11-26-2017, 08:45 AM)Audrey Hepburn Wrote: Thank you for providing details to your original post.
My response was not meant to be condemning; I was simply posting my opinion and experiences based on the limited information you shared.  I wish your wife lots of luck.

Thanks, Audrey
You are right about the limited info that I provided in the opening post. I should have told more about the situation with my wife right from the get-go. Perhaps I also should have included the experience's of her sister. I honestly wasn't certain that anyone would have interest in the thread, and I figured that I would add details as it moved along (if anyone took and interest and wanted to hear). I tend to be very well longwinded and I am often tended to start thread's with huge opening statement's. I worry about boring people and about long post's turning them away. In this case, I should have gone for a more comprehensive post right off the bat. I appreciate your concern for my wife and you taking the time to try to help her. Thanks a lot for your comments.   RM

(11-26-2017, 01:57 PM)Linville Wrote: Rafterman, may I ask you what type of work you do? Or did do? ( retired medical professional of what discipline )

I might have missed it, if so sorry.

It is early and I got thru most of your post but not all just now.

Are you a doctor, psychologist etc. ? counselor maybe. before retiring.

I guess you do know that it is hard to hear such heavy life advice from someone so close , "usually ".

Although I may have missed some but it kind of sounds like she did not want to do what you advised, it that it ?

She is an RN of 30 years then she will have certain knowledge as well pertinent to her situation, how do you receive hers?
Or has she said?

So many unknown factors in this as you say.

But ur bottom line is that getting optional surgery needs to be well one needs to have done their due diligence ? Right.

anyway....just rambling
Hey Linville,
I retired recently from a career as a licensed psychotherapist. I hold a master's in clinical psych. Every state is different in what you can do in that field with a master's. All I ever wanted to do was see client's and be solely responsible for their care. I didn't want to be "under" anyone. With the exception of the fact that our office did use prescribing doctor's to script for controlled substances, I was given free reign in the treatment of my client's. No one oversaw what I did and I could prescribe for anything unscheduled. For example, before August 2014, I would script from TRAM fairly regularly. (Off label, as an AD. IMO, it's far quicker in reaching people who are truly in crisis). I gave it all up when diagnosed with motor-neuron disease 11 months ago. Being able to post on here definitely gives me a sense of purpose. I have never been a member of a forum that had so many gracious, caring, non-judgmental and knowledgeable people. It's like a dream. I am able to continue to learn things and also to share what I know.

Oh, the reason that I always say that I was a "medical professional" is that my job had much to do with pharmacology and psychopharmacology, and we treated the body as well as the mind. An advanced clinical psychology degree brings with it a huge amount of actual medical training. After my undergrad degree, I spend countless semester credit hours attending nursing classes and working in hospitals. At one point, I ended up assisting MD's with prostate biopsies! (I was like "what exactly does this have to do with psychology?" lol ) It was crazy.

While completing my master's, I also worked as a "psychiatric aid" in the biggest psychiatric hospital in my state. My job was essentially to examine patient's, help them dress, etc. It was more like working as a medic. They want to give you a "baptism by fire" by making all potential future psychotherapist's prove that they can handle any situation because the job is not for the feint of heart.

My wife has seen a lot of action, too. She has worked in just about every capacity that a nurse can work. We have traded off advice for the entire time we have been married. I welcome any advice that she has for me. She just went back to school to complete her MSN, and is becoming a Nurse Practitioner. Pretty bold move after 30 years as an RN. RN's are a tight bunch and after that many years in the business, they usually stay put. I want her to be whatever she wants to be and to be fulfilled. I couldn't live one minute without her.

Yes, I just want her to complete her due diligence before jumping into the surgery....as she would want me to complete mine if I sought to have elective surgery. We respect each other's opinions. It's all good.

Thanks for asking! If I am nothing at all, I am longwinded. Sorry about that! Take care for now, my friend.  RM  
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#14
Thank you Rafterman for the detailed answer.

Good luck to you .

I suppose that ur recent diagnosis has given you a desire to participate in a forum such as this, so do not be afraid of being long winded, that is okay.

Did you say that you retired before the diagnosis or just after it?

Did that cause you to want to retire?

With your knowledge you could help so many others that are in need.
Gently advising or suggesting.

Anyway just thinking on paper so to speak.

Again good luck, Rafterman and thank you for engaging in conversation and understanding especially,
ALL the Pioneers have good intentions in mind for members.

You might be surprised members enjoying discussions going very deep here.

remaining civil is critical as you know even if you think another is not,  that can only lead to bad .

Enough rambling......have a good day.

 If you get tired, learn to rest, not to quit.
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#15
Nice thread Rafterman....and nice posts.

It is indeed a difficult and complex subject, and one well worth discussing.

None of us knows it all when it comes to either food or psychological motivations.
Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there may be in silence - Desiderata
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#16
(11-27-2017, 02:47 PM)Linville Wrote: Thank you Rafterman for the detailed answer.

Good luck to you .

I suppose that ur recent diagnosis has given you a desire to participate in a forum such as this, so do not be afraid of being long winded, that is okay.

Did you say that you retired before the diagnosis or just after it?

Did that cause you to want to retire?

With your knowledge you could help so many others that are in need.
Gently advising or suggesting.

Anyway just thinking on paper so to speak.

Again good luck, Rafterman and thank you for engaging in conversation and understanding especially,
ALL the Pioneers have good intentions in mind for members.

You might be surprised members enjoying discussions going very deep here.

remaining civil is critical as you know even if you think another is not,  that can only lead to bad .

Enough rambling......have a good day.
Thanks, Linville. I had symptom's for about a 16 month's before getting my ALS diagnosis, and continued working. The symptoms were crazy. My hands and arms were quite numb and it felt like I was moving around someone else's limb's. I also had (and still have) fasciculation's (rapid muscle twitching) throughout my body and on my face. Fever's, incredible insomnia, severe tremor (can't hold a cup of water). And I won't even go into the pain level, as this disease causes each joint to separate from the muscles that are holding it in place. Probably why it remains the most dreaded diagnosis worldwide. I was going to work on 3 or 4 hours of sleep, 6 days a week. When they tell you have this disease, you need every bit of emotional strength that you can summon because you know that you are headed for paraplegia. My job was 32 miles away and I was forced to turn in my license as things got worse. That is when I pulled the plug. We may be making a trip to Germany to have more experimental treatment done. The goal now is to slow it down in the meantime and I believe that is working, to a degree. Still praying for a remission, which is extremely rare in ALS, but it does give some hope...... Yes, I know that all of the pioneer members on here are incredible. Before joining, I visited the forum nearly 400 times...to read posts and see how the members interacted. This forum is a league of it's own. I would not have joined it if it wasn't. I wanted a judgment-free zone, with respectful and knowledgeable people and that is exactly what I got. Many people on here are more knowledgeable than Ph.D.'s that I worked with in the field. It's extraordinary to find that in a forum. Everyone has been great. Like I was saying to Audrey a couple of post's up from this one, I am at fault for sometime's starting a thread that gives too little of the story upfront. That leaves member's with no choice but to presume what the missing information is. I know that all you guy's have a huge heart for people and dedicate massive amount's of time helping them on here. It's a true act of charity and those are rare these days. Didn't mean to bum anyone out with the disease talk, but you did ask about me leaving the job and I wanted you to know why. In a way. I felt bad leaving some of my older client's, but gave many my email and home phone number. I also left them in the capable hands of an experienced therapist who took my place. (Oh, thanks for telling me that longwinded is okay here! I don't know any other way).

Thanks again. RM

(11-27-2017, 06:15 PM)Popster Wrote: Nice thread Rafterman....and nice posts.

It is indeed a difficult and complex subject, and one well worth discussing.

None of us knows it all when it comes to either food or psychological motivations.

Than you, Popster. It is always good to get positive feedback about a thread, especially from a pioneer member. Much respect to you, Audrey, Linville, Fireplaces and all the other's who have given me a warm welcome on here!  RM

I should have been more specific when I used the word "license". It was my driver's license that I was forced to turn in. A physician in my state is compelled to report to the DMV certain patient's (epileptic's, those with MND's., etc) and that's how they got wind of my disability and yanked my driver's license. I didn't want anyone to think that they took away my psychotherapist's license just for been sick. That would be pretty bad, lol. You all have a great day.
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