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Kratom
#31
(12-31-2017, 12:30 PM)Rafterman Wrote: Hey all, K was moved to Sched 1 in September and I don't believe that decision has been reversed. Better check with the admin, because I do not believe it can still be discussed on here (at least for the time being). Peace. RM

negative on it being scheduled. They tried but to no avail.
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#32
Hey all,
Go to the link and then scroll down to the part that I pasted from it (below). Its the latest info on the status of K. Lots of old articles from 2016 said that the Feds weren't going to ban it after all, but this news trumps that news. 


hxxps://www.foleyservices.com/news/dea-r...le-1-drug/

SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 – The Drug Enforcement Agency has announced that as of September 30th, the drug Kratom will be a Schedule I drug. A Schedule I is considered a narcotic with no currently accepted medical use (along with drugs like Heroin, LSD and MDMA). This is due in part to its increased use recreationally as well as its link to numerous deaths in the U.S.
The herbal supplement is derived from a tree called Mitragyna speciosa, which is native to Southeast Asia. In these regions it has been traditionally used as a medicine to relieve pain and increase energy and appetite. Its use for Opioid withdrawal can be traced back to 1940’s Thailand. Currently, Kratom is being used as a non-prescribed opiate replacement as well as a recreational drug. Testimonials about its potency as well as its legal status have led to recent increases in its recreational use in the US in the past decade. It is most often brewed into tea but can also be chewed, smoked or ingested in a capsule.
Despite claims of Kratom’s medicinal value, at this point there is little research to support its usefulness as a medicine. Minor side effects of the drug include itchiness and vomiting, but more severe effects included respiratory depression, seizure, and psychosis. The substance has a risk of addiction and has been linked to 15 deaths in the U.S. between 2014 and 2016. U.S. Poison centers have received and increase in the number of calls about Kratom, from 26 in 2010 to 263 in 2015.
The DEA published a notice on August 31 in the Federal Register arguing that Kratom needs to undergo emergency drug scheduling and that “such action is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety.” The listing is temporary, and will last between one and three years. In this time, the DEA will be able to further research this substance and make a final determination if this schedule is appropriate.
The DEA’s ruling follows the lead of many states that have been recently banning the substance, specifically Indiana, Wisconsin, Vermont, Tennessee and most recently Alabama and Arkansas.
In the immediate interim, this ruling should have no effect on DOT drug testing programs as the psychoactive compounds in Kratom (mitragynin and 7-hydroxymitragynine) are not tested for in a 5-panel DOT drug screen. However, as a Schedule I drug, DOT employers should be aware that use of Kratom is still a disqualifying offense, even if it does not appear on a drug screen. Kratom is not currently available for testing so other drug testing programs should remain unchanged. However, this may be subject to change and if/when it does, employers may want to consider expanding their testing panels to include it.
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#33
(01-01-2018, 02:38 PM)Rafterman Wrote: Hey all,
Go to the link and then scroll down to the part that I pasted from it (below). Its the latest info on the status of K. Lots of old articles from 2016 said that the Feds weren't going to ban it after all, but this news trumps that news. 


hxxps://www.foleyservices.com/news/dea-r...le-1-drug/

SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 – The Drug Enforcement Agency has announced that as of September 30th, the drug Kratom will be a Schedule I drug. A Schedule I is considered a narcotic with no currently accepted medical use (along with drugs like Heroin, LSD and MDMA). This is due in part to its increased use recreationally as well as its link to numerous deaths in the U.S.
The herbal supplement is derived from a tree called Mitragyna speciosa, which is native to Southeast Asia. In these regions it has been traditionally used as a medicine to relieve pain and increase energy and appetite. Its use for Opioid withdrawal can be traced back to 1940’s Thailand. Currently, Kratom is being used as a non-prescribed opiate replacement as well as a recreational drug. Testimonials about its potency as well as its legal status have led to recent increases in its recreational use in the US in the past decade. It is most often brewed into tea but can also be chewed, smoked or ingested in a capsule.
Despite claims of Kratom’s medicinal value, at this point there is little research to support its usefulness as a medicine. Minor side effects of the drug include itchiness and vomiting, but more severe effects included respiratory depression, seizure, and psychosis. The substance has a risk of addiction and has been linked to 15 deaths in the U.S. between 2014 and 2016. U.S. Poison centers have received and increase in the number of calls about Kratom, from 26 in 2010 to 263 in 2015.
The DEA published a notice on August 31 in the Federal Register arguing that Kratom needs to undergo emergency drug scheduling and that “such action is necessary to avoid an imminent hazard to the public safety.” The listing is temporary, and will last between one and three years. In this time, the DEA will be able to further research this substance and make a final determination if this schedule is appropriate.
The DEA’s ruling follows the lead of many states that have been recently banning the substance, specifically Indiana, Wisconsin, Vermont, Tennessee and most recently Alabama and Arkansas.
In the immediate interim, this ruling should have no effect on DOT drug testing programs as the psychoactive compounds in Kratom (mitragynin and 7-hydroxymitragynine) are not tested for in a 5-panel DOT drug screen. However, as a Schedule I drug, DOT employers should be aware that use of Kratom is still a disqualifying offense, even if it does not appear on a drug screen. Kratom is not currently available for testing so other drug testing programs should remain unchanged. However, this may be subject to change and if/when it does, employers may want to consider expanding their testing panels to include it.

My apologies. I did not mean to post that as a live link. I am going to ask one of the mods to change it out for me. 
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#34
hm, I must've heard wrong. Funny, all the sources haven't changed a thing except for calling it kratom, they have M. speciosa. lol. Whole grey area.

Also I have to laugh at it being related to deaths. Kid does meth and kratom in one day..kratom killed him.

propaganda all of it.
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#35
Kratom is not a schedule 1 in the states?The DEA tried to banish it that way last 2016,but people fought it,and there is pending legislation but it has not yet been confirmed or denied,it is also trying to ban Tumeric,a natural Indian spice used for pain and inflammation,,it's in curry spice..rediculous,we should not be forced to pay a doctor and get pills every time we have a health issue or discomfort,,sheesh I wish they would leave the plants alone,,God put them on earth to help but big pharm wants us to pay them..
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#36
Justice1.....Yep it's a racket! Tumeric, you got to be kidding. Why not ban oleander bushes while there at it, as it's poisonous. I cook with mushrooms all the time, but if I'm caught with the wrong kind of shroom, then I go to jail. Any plant in it's relative natural state should be left alone.

Still waiting to see what they're going to do about Kratom and with Jeff Sessions in power who knows! He wants to crack down on states that have legalized mj. What happened to state rights? I guess, only when it's convenient and when it fits their political motives.
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#37
Yes,including agree more,,I'm not really a conspiracy person but I do believe this banning of freedom is a way to keep the slaves separate,making working people pay extraordinary prices for health,,it keeps them broke and in debt,and that means more money to the rich..So corrupt..Omg if I knew all of this as the future I would have moves aboad.
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#38
The war on drugs has been an absolute failure. Have they learned nothing from MJ? I feel for yous guys south of the border

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#39
So Jeff Sessions taking away states power to choose..I am seriously dissapointed,I'm not a weed smoker,I do use cbd oil and kratom for up to moderate pain and it's effective..We need to stand up to this a hole.he is trying to take away our freedom as in the land of the free,I feel like the 1 percent wants the rest to have less and less power,and taking away these home remedies and tax revenues for the states which are being used to fix roads and for schools and the industries employ so many people it's not fair..We need to stand up to these people.I belong to a kratom unitedfacebook group,also kratom watchdogs,and I am sickened by this abuse of power,sheep who follow path and have no way to gather momentum to move up and or keep the middle class status..Wages are decreased in my proffesion,I made 48 dollars hourly in 2012,and now I'm lucky to make 34 an hour,,I'm a nurse with 30 yrs experience.i could go on and on but wont,,let's band together and fight this,it's crossing the line and infringing on our freedom,I live in Wa state and weed has been legal since 2014.
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