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Share you tips for getting out of bed with depression
#11
Don't hit snooze! Seriously it's a difficult habit to get out of but you feel so much better getting out of bed straight away instead of turning snooze off every 10 minutes. I have a morning play list full of some of my favourite chill songs to wake up to so I can gradually start going about my day with. Two of the most effective methods are (1) exercising first thing to get the blood pumping even if it's just a ten minute jog and (2) a cold shower to get the blood pumping. Both are easier said than done though!
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#12
(11-27-2017, 03:33 PM)Glousck Wrote: Don't hit snooze! Seriously it's a difficult habit to get out of but you feel so much better getting out of bed straight away instead of turning snooze off every 10 minutes. I have a morning play list full of some of my favourite chill songs to wake up to so I can gradually start going about my day with. Two of the most effective methods are (1) exercising first thing to get the blood pumping even if it's just a ten minute jog and (2) a cold shower to get the blood pumping. Both are easier said than done though!

Thanks again, Glousck. I have successfully used the exercise method in past times. It worked for me when I was mildly depressed, but I had a lot of trouble with it first thing in the morning when I had major depressive disorder. I barely wanted to live another minute, much less do anything that required effort. I used to get emotionally stronger as the day went into night...probably because I was looking for to the oncoming sleep as a form of escape. I was a lifetime bodybuilder who thrived on the chemical rush of exercise. Now I am forbidden to even think about exercising, as I had a diagnosis of MND last year. They want me to baby every muscle. It sucks, because I know how hard it is to get happy without exercising. But I think that what you recommend would work for a good amount of people. Thanks for contributing to the thread.  RM
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#13
It's interesting reading how others cope with depression. I've always suffered from depression since I was a kid. Some periods were much darker than others but that cloud of hopelessness has always been present in some way, shape, or form. For many years I tried to combat it with alcohol and substance abuse but that only made it more complicated and eradic.  I'm an addict, plain and simple.  But, last year I hit my absolute rock bottom emotionally and psychologically so I went to rehab-then a sober living environment and eventually back out on my own. I've found that by not abusing drugs or drinking alcohol my life is MUCH less complicated and somewhat manageable.  I still have spurts of depression but I think everyone feels a little hopeless at some point in their life. For me, I set my alarm an hour and a half before I have to leave the house every morning and I get up immediately when it goes off. I drink a 5 hour energy and smoke a cigarette and immediately get in the shower. Then by the time I'm showered and dressed I read a brief 1-2 page daily meditation that seems to get my head in the right gear for the day, eat, and head to work. I will also attend a few AA or NA meetings a week just to keep things in perspective and also because for me they are very therapeutic. Between the meetings and my work schedule, depression has not been nearly as intrusive or dominant as it always has in the past. For me, keeping busy and also trying to get out of self are both detrimental to battling my depression.  I don't drink anymore because it always takes control at some point and I end up making the same mistakes again and again. I was also an active opiate addict for many years so I know that my life is completely unmanageable if I'm using opiates or any n@rcotics for that matter. The only thing I take is K-pins and occasionally I'll rotate through a few benz-OH-s to keep my tolerance low and my mind and body relaxed. Anyways, that's my 2 cents on depression.
Well I jumped into the river to many times to make it home...

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#14
(11-28-2017, 10:17 AM)Rafterman Wrote:
(11-27-2017, 03:33 PM)Glousck Wrote: Don't hit snooze! Seriously it's a difficult habit to get out of but you feel so much better getting out of bed straight away instead of turning snooze off every 10 minutes. I have a morning play list full of some of my favourite chill songs to wake up to so I can gradually start going about my day with. Two of the most effective methods are (1) exercising first thing to get the blood pumping even if it's just a ten minute jog and (2) a cold shower to get the blood pumping. Both are easier said than done though!

Thanks again, Glousck. I have successfully used the exercise method in past times. It worked for me when I was mildly depressed, but I had a lot of trouble with it first thing in the morning when I had major depressive disorder. I barely wanted to live another minute, much less do anything that required effort. I used to get emotionally stronger as the day went into night...probably because I was looking for to the oncoming sleep as a form of escape. I was a lifetime bodybuilder who thrived on the chemical rush of exercise. Now I am forbidden to even think about exercising, as I had a diagnosis of MND last year. They want me to baby every muscle. It sucks, because I know how hard it is to get happy without exercising. But I think that what you recommend would work for a good amount of people. Thanks for contributing to the thread.  RM

I feel what you are saying in my heart because I have been in a similar situation to you. When you have major depressive disorder, anhedonia creeps in and you wonder what is the point of anything, least of all committing to anything positive is. It's totally understandable as to why you feel that way at night time too...i suppose for me it feels like a time when I'm allowed to be in bed doing nothing. So there's no reason to feel guilty at that time for being depressed and doing nothing, whereas I might feel differently during the daytime. 

Again this is easier said than done (after all, if recovering from depression was easy then none of us would have it!) but routine is such a crucial thing for recovery also. This my to-do list/reminder list every day:

Wake up 8am
Get out of bed straight away
Make bed
Shower
Get changed 
Breakfast
Brush teeth
Hair, moisturiser, make up 
Put clothes in washing machine
Go for a walk
Speak to someone
Lunch
Tidy up 
Hang clothes from the washing out to dry
Study
Speak to someone
Dinner
Wash plates up
Relax
Optional: Read DBT book
Wash face
Brush teeth
Get clothes ready for tomorrow 
Settle down for bed by 10pm

As you can see its not an overly strenuous or exciting to-do list, it's more of a reminder of what needs to be done to get through the day. If my mood is decent then the list will only be glanced at a couple times a day, because I might be going to see some friends, to the gym or elsewhere which means I can't tick everything off that day. Plus when I don't feel like I'm achieving much, it's nice to say to myself at the end of the day...hey, well done, good job. That positive reinforcement is so important. I was having a discussion with my CPN (Community Psychiatric Nurse) and she said people with depression often speak to themselves in a negative way in their heads which reinforces their low moods because it's like being in an abusive relationship with yourself that you can't leave. So we have to try to make that relationship more manageable...if we are going to speak negatively to ourselves for doing something wrong, we might as well speak to ourselves in a positive manner to try and balance things out! So I started doing that step-by-step "Hey, you managed to get out of bed and into the shower, that's amazing! Well done you, you've made sure it'd going to be an awesome day now!". Did I believe what I was saying at first? God, no. But as time passes and you get into a routine of positive reinforcement, it starts to become second nature and you find yourself gravitating to that way of thinking naturally, and even believing what you are saying. We have to make an effort to be kind to ourselves because it is impossible to have a decent quality of life whilst you are being abusive to yourself in your head. 

I don't know if you ever go on Reddit but on one of their subreddits a while back someone posted a thread saying "What can I say to someone who is depressed to cheer them up?" and everyone replied saying...you can't. There simply isn't a magical combination of words someone can spew from their mouths to make a person 'un-depressed'. At the same time, regardless of how strong we are, it is important to concede that it is 100x more difficult to go through this alone. When we withdraw away from friends, family, group activities, therapists etc then our condition inevitably gets worse. We are all human and it is not possible to feel good all the time. Reaching out to someone is NEVER a sign of weakness, no matter your age, gender, whatever, you should never keep your feelings bottled up. I have male friends who will sometimes cry if we are talking about something upsetting, and none of us ever think less of them for doing so. When it needs to come out, let it out. 

So (1) routine, even if it's a basic one and (2) reach out to people. This doesn't mean people around you are responsible for your happiness - that is always in our hands, it is our own responsibility - but being around empathetic and understanding people does anyone a world of good. I feel like poor sleep is always a symptom of a bigger issue...if the rest of your life is chaotic or out of control then it seems inevitable that your sleep will not be 'normal'. Rome wasn't built in a day and although baby steps can be so frustrating, it is often the only way. I am not too familiar with MND but I am sorry you are going through this. When I have 50 posts if you ever need someone to speak to please don't hesitate to PM me. I'm hoping I'll get there in a week or so. It must be incredibly frustrating for you not to have the exercise option available to you after the life you've led with bodybuilding. Are you able to work with a physio at all or do something like Tai Chi or yoga? Do you have any understanding health professionals that you are working with? I apologise if I'm coming across ignorant at all. It's indeed shocking that we are living in 2017 and so many mental and physical health issues remain without appropriate and suitable treatments when millions and millions of people worldwide are suffering every day.
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#15
(11-29-2017, 01:35 PM)Glousck Wrote:
(11-28-2017, 10:17 AM)Rafterman Wrote:
(11-27-2017, 03:33 PM)Glousck Wrote: Don't hit snooze! Seriously it's a difficult habit to get out of but you feel so much better getting out of bed straight away instead of turning snooze off every 10 minutes. I have a morning play list full of some of my favourite chill songs to wake up to so I can gradually start going about my day with. Two of the most effective methods are (1) exercising first thing to get the blood pumping even if it's just a ten minute jog and (2) a cold shower to get the blood pumping. Both are easier said than done though!

Thanks again, Glousck. I have successfully used the exercise method in past times. It worked for me when I was mildly depressed, but I had a lot of trouble with it first thing in the morning when I had major depressive disorder. I barely wanted to live another minute, much less do anything that required effort. I used to get emotionally stronger as the day went into night...probably because I was looking for to the oncoming sleep as a form of escape. I was a lifetime bodybuilder who thrived on the chemical rush of exercise. Now I am forbidden to even think about exercising, as I had a diagnosis of MND last year. They want me to baby every muscle. It sucks, because I know how hard it is to get happy without exercising. But I think that what you recommend would work for a good amount of people. Thanks for contributing to the thread.  RM

I feel what you are saying in my heart because I have been in a similar situation to you. When you have major depressive disorder, anhedonia creeps in and you wonder what is the point of anything, least of all committing to anything positive is. It's totally understandable as to why you feel that way at night time too...i suppose for me it feels like a time when I'm allowed to be in bed doing nothing. So there's no reason to feel guilty at that time for being depressed and doing nothing, whereas I might feel differently during the daytime. 

Again this is easier said than done (after all, if recovering from depression was easy then none of us would have it!) but routine is such a crucial thing for recovery also. This my to-do list/reminder list every day:

Wake up 8am
Get out of bed straight away
Make bed
Shower
Get changed 
Breakfast
Brush teeth
Hair, moisturiser, make up 
Put clothes in washing machine
Go for a walk
Speak to someone
Lunch
Tidy up 
Hang clothes from the washing out to dry
Study
Speak to someone
Dinner
Wash plates up
Relax
Optional: Read DBT book
Wash face
Brush teeth
Get clothes ready for tomorrow 
Settle down for bed by 10pm

As you can see its not an overly strenuous or exciting to-do list, it's more of a reminder of what needs to be done to get through the day. If my mood is decent then the list will only be glanced at a couple times a day, because I might be going to see some friends, to the gym or elsewhere which means I can't tick everything off that day. Plus when I don't feel like I'm achieving much, it's nice to say to myself at the end of the day...hey, well done, good job. That positive reinforcement is so important. I was having a discussion with my CPN (Community Psychiatric Nurse) and she said people with depression often speak to themselves in a negative way in their heads which reinforces their low moods because it's like being in an abusive relationship with yourself that you can't leave. So we have to try to make that relationship more manageable...if we are going to speak negatively to ourselves for doing something wrong, we might as well speak to ourselves in a positive manner to try and balance things out! So I started doing that step-by-step "Hey, you managed to get out of bed and into the shower, that's amazing! Well done you, you've made sure it'd going to be an awesome day now!". Did I believe what I was saying at first? God, no. But as time passes and you get into a routine of positive reinforcement, it starts to become second nature and you find yourself gravitating to that way of thinking naturally, and even believing what you are saying. We have to make an effort to be kind to ourselves because it is impossible to have a decent quality of life whilst you are being abusive to yourself in your head. 

I don't know if you ever go on Reddit but on one of their subreddits a while back someone posted a thread saying "What can I say to someone who is depressed to cheer them up?" and everyone replied saying...you can't. There simply isn't a magical combination of words someone can spew from their mouths to make a person 'un-depressed'. At the same time, regardless of how strong we are, it is important to concede that it is 100x more difficult to go through this alone. When we withdraw away from friends, family, group activities, therapists etc then our condition inevitably gets worse. We are all human and it is not possible to feel good all the time. Reaching out to someone is NEVER a sign of weakness, no matter your age, gender, whatever, you should never keep your feelings bottled up. I have male friends who will sometimes cry if we are talking about something upsetting, and none of us ever think less of them for doing so. When it needs to come out, let it out. 

So (1) routine, even if it's a basic one and (2) reach out to people. This doesn't mean people around you are responsible for your happiness - that is always in our hands, it is our own responsibility - but being around empathetic and understanding people does anyone a world of good. I feel like poor sleep is always a symptom of a bigger issue...if the rest of your life is chaotic or out of control then it seems inevitable that your sleep will not be 'normal'. Rome wasn't built in a day and although baby steps can be so frustrating, it is often the only way. I am not too familiar with MND but I am sorry you are going through this. When I have 50 posts if you ever need someone to speak to please don't hesitate to PM me. I'm hoping I'll get there in a week or so. It must be incredibly frustrating for you not to have the exercise option available to you after the life you've led with bodybuilding. Are you able to work with a physio at all or do something like Tai Chi or yoga? Do you have any understanding health professionals that you are working with? I apologise if I'm coming across ignorant at all. It's indeed shocking that we are living in 2017 and so many mental and physical health issues remain without appropriate and suitable treatments when millions and millions of people worldwide are suffering every day.

Wow! Thank you so much. What a wonderful and caring person that you must be. All of your advice is perfect and I really appreciate the time that took to write it all out. I have given similar advice (I am a retire psychotherapist). Everything you said rings true and would help anyone who is smart enough to give your recommendations a try. I spent 30 years counseling people with emotional illness, all the time being worse off than many of them. It was torture getting to work on some days and then listening to some of the saddest and most desperate people that you could imagine. I started having odd symptom's (limb numbness, muscle twitches around the clock, hand cramping, etc) about mid 2015. I was finally diagnosed with ALS in December of 2016 and retired. Good thing that my wife is a career RN and that we have been together for almost 40 years. I know what is coming my way, as we had a friend who had this disease. Well. anyway, thank you so, so much for what you wrote. You really made my day. It's such a blessing to know that there are still people who care more about others than they care about themselves.  Have a great day.  RM

(11-29-2017, 02:16 AM)Quest4Peace Wrote: It's interesting reading how others cope with depression. I've always suffered from depression since I was a kid. Some periods were much darker than others but that cloud of hopelessness has always been present in some way, shape, or form. For many years I tried to combat it with alcohol and substance abuse but that only made it more complicated and eradic.  I'm an addict, plain and simple.  But, last year I hit my absolute rock bottom emotionally and psychologically so I went to rehab-then a sober living environment and eventually back out on my own. I've found that by not abusing drugs or drinking alcohol my life is MUCH less complicated and somewhat manageable.  I still have spurts of depression but I think everyone feels a little hopeless at some point in their life. For me, I set my alarm an hour and a half before I have to leave the house every morning and I get up immediately when it goes off. I drink a 5 hour energy and smoke a cigarette and immediately get in the shower. Then by the time I'm showered and dressed I read a brief 1-2 page daily meditation that seems to get my head in the right gear for the day, eat, and head to work. I will also attend a few AA or NA meetings a week just to keep things in perspective and also because for me they are very therapeutic. Between the meetings and my work schedule, depression has not been nearly as intrusive or dominant as it always has in the past. For me, keeping busy and also trying to get out of self are both detrimental to battling my depression.  I don't drink anymore because it always takes control at some point and I end up making the same mistakes again and again. I was also an active opiate addict for many years so I know that my life is completely unmanageable if I'm using opiates or any n@rcotics for that matter. The only thing I take is K-pins and occasionally I'll rotate through a few benz-OH-s to keep my tolerance low and my mind and body relaxed. Anyways, that's my 2 cents on depression.
Thanks Quest4Peace,
I completely feel for you and I thank you for sharing some of what you have been through and your recommendations for me. Everything that you say makes sense and I can see how it would work. It sounds like you have made phenomenal progress and have come almost all the way back. In fact, you may be all the way back because, even though you still have some depressive tendencies, you say that you have been that way since childhood. Me, too. I know exactly what you are saying. I often tell people that I have never been the type of person to do cartwheels and that I can only get but "so happy". The most that I have every hoped for is emotional stability and some moments of happiness. I, too, am now only maintained on c-pam and occasionally rotate through some benzo's...exactly like you do. Congratulations on all the progress that you have made. It is inspirational. And thanks for sharing your story and your tips. I really appreciate it. RM
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#16
Having a schedule and small goals for the day does wonders. I know when i've got an open expanse of time and nothing planned by brain truly becomes a washing machine for anxiety
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#17
So many good ideas! I have never thought of drinking water, with or without the snooze button. I've heard that drinking water with lemon is good for you first thing in the morning. But, to me, that meant getting out of bed and "making" it. A bottle of water to get your body hydrated and ready even before getting up and having coffee. I'm definitely trying this. Also having a schedule is critical for me. When I don't have one, I usually say to myself, I'll watch the news for a little while and then binge watch something for the rest of the day.
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