Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Naltrexone
#1
Hi all,

I was just given a prescription for naltrexone today to prevent alcohol relapse.  The list of side effects are daunting to say the least.  Anyone here have any experiences?  I'm getting ready to take my first dose and feeling nervous.

~M 

Undecided
Reply
#2
So you should report back to us how it works.

 If you get tired, learn to rest, not to quit.
Reply
#3
johnw4
(09-29-2017, 12:55 AM)MrFussbudget Wrote: Hi all,

I was just given a prescription for naltrexone today to prevent alcohol relapse.  The list of side effects are daunting to say the least.  Anyone here have any experiences?  I'm getting ready to take my first dose and feeling nervous.

~M 

Undecided

Hi MrFussbudget,

I am in the UK and have been 'dry' for a decade now, but have forgotten the name of the meds I was prescribed at the time.
But if naltrexone is the same as I was prescribed at that time it was great for stopping me lapsing.

I was (am) a 'functioning alcoholic' and as soon as I started taking the meds (and started going to meetings) I just didn't feel the compulsion to carry on drinking. It also makes you feel very ill if you do lapse...apparently.

I just did as I was told...I really had reached rock bottom and I really did want to stop what drinking was doing to me and my relationships...and so I finished the meds and never went back.

It really is a cliché I know, but you really do need to really want to stop.

Wishing you the best of luck.

John

Hi John!

Thank you for the response.  It was good to read about your experience.  I am also a "functioning alcoholic" but I haven't reached rock bottom as so many people discuss in meetings. My family and closest friends don't even know about my addiction, because I've always drank alone or on the sly.  I've been able to drink "normally" at social/family gatherings.  But I'm definitely addicted and had been drinking every day for a long time.  Though I never liked getting drunk, I was losing control more and more lately and had some bad episodes.  I have been sober for a little over a week and the cravings have been intense.  I started the naltrexone today and the only side effect so far is sound sensitivity.  (I didn't even know that was a thing, but everything is hurting my ears today.)  But no nausea or anything else.  I'm still craving alcohol so far, but it's only day one.  I'm officially on more medication than I ever have been in my life now with the naltrexone, trazodone and ambien.  It makes me nervous, but I'm sure it's much better than drinking...

Thanks again for sharing your experience!  Congratulations on your decade of sobriety. Smile Smile  ~M
Reply
#4
Hi again...

Yes, I found it odd at the time taking so many drugs...they had me on Val as well in those days...which really helped...especially with the sleeping.

I had drunk every day for longer than I care to remember, and was working in a very hospitable, social industry where jet lag meant we all felt we could drink at anytime of day...just fatal. I remember on the training course being told "you are starting a career where it's perfectly OK to 'have drink' for breakfast when you get back home, after your duty"! Yes, really!!!

I was 27 then and we really did have one long party. But there was a price to pay and 10 years ago, when I was 49, I finally said "enough is enough". I had a great doctor and knew someone who went to AA meetings and I really owe them both big time for how they helped me.

I know exactly what you mean about 'secret drinking'...I did the same on my days off when my partner went off to work in the morning. I feel really ashamed about it now. But I'll be 60 this Christmas (a great time for a recovering alcoholic...not!) and I feel better than I've felt in ages. I've taken voluntary redundancy from my work, so my hours are completely 'normal' now, which really has helped.

I know it's hard, but the drugs and the meetings will really help you to get through it. And you really get to know who your friends are.

If you ever want to 'talk' about it just send me a private message. I'm told I'm a good listener.

All the best,

John
Reply
#5
Hi MrFussBudget1

I came across your post about Naltrexone, and it immediately caught my eye and I felt the need to read about more into what you are going though and a few other posts on this page.  It seems this is from a couple months back, so I would love to see how this has worked out for you!  Some people have had mixed reviews with this drug (even myself) Originally trying the drug at about 25.. I did not find it to do much.  I truly believe this was because I wasn't ready to quit drinking.  Then fast forward to about 3 years ago when I gave it a shot again, but I used it alongside with antabuse (not many like it, but I felt I needed an extra safety net to make sure I didn't let me fall into a mistake in those moments of craving.  This time; the two together helped change my life.  After a few months, I got off the neltrexone because I found my cravings were under control (still stuck with the antabuse another half of a year (why not?? I understant it isn't good for the liver but it is weird better than alcohol lol.).  plus, they check your ALT/AST each 1-2 visits and mine were a-ok each time.  After about 8 months, I was off those, and have been alcohol free for almost 3 years now.  It is a lot of willpower of course!! but I can't picturing it without naltrexone and antabuse Smile
"You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step.” - Dr. MLK Jr.
Reply
#6
Hi maeve! I am just now seeing this message from January. I'm so happy to hear you found success with these medications! I started antabuse yesterday, and wished I had tried it months ago. I think in conjunction with the naltrexone (and my desire to stop drinking) --I am feeling optimistic. Thanks for sharing and congrats on 3 years sobriety!!!
Reply
#7
I have to say, low dose naltrexone has been a lifesaver for me this summer. It's also amazing the research it has on reducing inflammation in the body for diseases like Parkinson's and so many other things. Not only does it decrease cravings, but it just in general makes my body feel <i>healthier</i>.
Reply
#8
(05-31-2018, 08:57 PM)MrFussbudget Wrote: Hi maeve!  I am just now seeing this message from January.  I'm so happy to hear you found success with these medications!  I started antabuse yesterday, and wished I had tried it months ago.  I think in conjunction with the naltrexone (and my desire to stop drinking) --I am feeling optimistic.  Thanks for sharing and congrats on 3 years sobriety!!!

I know this is an older post I replying to, but I put myself on antabuse for relapse prevention prior to my last treatment. Figured F those AA guys, this is what I need. 

It definitely works. How I know it works is that it builds up in your system after taking for a while (i had taken for about a month). I premeditated a relapse as I had a weekend alone, so stopped taking on a Tuesday, thinking it'd be outta my system by the weekend. 

Drank a 750ml of Vodka (always Uncle Smirnoff)  Friday night. Dear lord the projectile vomiting, the unbelievable blotchy redness of my skin and just intense sweating and my face was so red it looked like the worst case of sunburn ever. It made me intensely sick and vomited like crazy for 30-60 minutes, dry heaves, incredibly sick, along looking like a had blotchy redness all over my body, I got through half the 750ml in ten minutes - the antabuse effects took about another 10-15 minutes to kick in. 

But dammit! I am not a quitter. After emptying my stomach of everything possible. I killed the rest of the bottle, drank Saturday with no vomiting, just blotchy redness. By Sunday the antabuse was out of my system and went on a full on bender rage only to end up in detox the following Tuesday at 3pm in the afternoon with a 0.43 BAC - I was walking and talking, and looked like hell, shocked I was functional (albeit I had some motor skills issues) at that level.  

So yeah, antabuse works. But for me it didn't stop me from drinking. And the good news is, I've been sober ever since. And I never refilled my antabuse, I changed my mind and decided I needed those AA guys.
Reply
#9
It's interesting, this is the first year I've heard Naltrexone being talked about a lot. I think it obviously would work best with psycho social therapy and things like AA. It's one thing to block your pleasure pathways and think you're a different person entirely, but one also has to realize the host of other self-centered tendencies that led to that point. Ultimately, taking naltrexone by itself doesn't give you the best chance of long-term recovery. One really has to get involved, help others, and really make recovery the most important thing in one's life.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)