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Days when it is difficult to move? lazy? or depressed?
#51
(01-08-2018, 03:03 PM)Naomi Wrote: I find myself feeling lazy more often than not. I know that depression can cause you to not find joy in things you once did, so I try not to beat myself up over it, but sometimes it's so bad where I can't even bring myself to do routine things, like go to work. I have to tell myself "you need money to pay for this apartment you're currently standing in". It makes me feel awful because it's such a normal thing, just going to work, but I feel like I have to really convince myself, or I won't go. Fortunately I can seem to force myself to shower every day, that's always a nice mood boost. I know how difficult the struggle is, I hope everyone in this thread is able to find some relief.

Hang in there, Naomi. There are tens of millions of us who can relate to exactly what you are saying. I know that it seems like an oversimplification, but its just biochemicals at work in your brain. Whatever biochemical mix you happen to have on hand at any given moment (assuming your receptors are functioning normally) controls your mood. People tell a depressed person that they don't have enough "guts" or enough "heart". Nonsense! It has nothing to do with willpower or desire. Your brain dictates your mood and we all have limited control over the moment to moment function of our brains. You are not lazy. That is another term that is commonly wrongly applied to those suffering from depression. You have a lack of motivation. Think of yourself as a car that is low on gas. Or even empty. A person can have all the willpower in the world and they still can not get a car with an empty gas tank to move.  A "lazy" person is someone who is not depressed, yet chooses to go the easy route out of luxury. Also, make no mistake...a good percentage of the public is walking around in the same situation. Do not feel strange or different. I hate to think of you suffering like that. If you care to share...is this a long term problem? Have you seen someone about it? Are you being medicated?  Regards, RM
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#52
Could be narcolepsy as well, doesn't sound like your Doc has looked into that.
A tree is known by its fruit; a man by his deeds. A good deed is never lost; he who sows courtesy reaps friendship, and he who plants kindness gathers love.

-- Saint Basil








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#53
(01-08-2018, 03:21 PM)Rafterman Wrote:
(01-08-2018, 03:03 PM)Naomi Wrote: I find myself feeling lazy more often than not. I know that depression can cause you to not find joy in things you once did, so I try not to beat myself up over it, but sometimes it's so bad where I can't even bring myself to do routine things, like go to work. I have to tell myself "you need money to pay for this apartment you're currently standing in". It makes me feel awful because it's such a normal thing, just going to work, but I feel like I have to really convince myself, or I won't go. Fortunately I can seem to force myself to shower every day, that's always a nice mood boost. I know how difficult the struggle is, I hope everyone in this thread is able to find some relief.

Hang in there, Naomi. There are tens of millions of us who can relate to exactly what you are saying. I know that it seems like an oversimplification, but its just biochemicals at work in your brain. Whatever biochemical mix you happen to have on hand at any given moment (assuming your receptors are functioning normally) controls your mood. People tell a depressed person that they don't have enough "guts" or enough "heart". Nonsense! It has nothing to do with willpower or desire. Your brain dictates your mood and we all have limited control over the moment to moment function of our brains. You are not lazy. That is another term that is commonly wrongly applied to those suffering from depression. You have a lack of motivation. Think of yourself as a car that is low on gas. Or even empty. A person can have all the willpower in the world and they still can not get a car with an empty gas tank to move.  A "lazy" person is someone who is not depressed, yet chooses to go the easy route out of luxury. Also, make no mistake...a good percentage of the public is walking around in the same situation. Do not feel strange or different. I hate to think of you suffering like that. If you care to share...is this a long term problem? Have you seen someone about it? Are you being medicated?  Regards, RM

Thank you for your thoughtful reply. Yes, I am fortunate enough to be receiving treatment as well as medication.  I know it's a long term thing to work on, but I have that innate desire for short term relief, you know?  I know that one day things will be better if I keep working on everything, that's what I hold onto.
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#54
(01-08-2018, 09:20 PM)Naomi Wrote:
(01-08-2018, 03:21 PM)Rafterman Wrote:
(01-08-2018, 03:03 PM)Naomi Wrote: I find myself feeling lazy more often than not. I know that depression can cause you to not find joy in things you once did, so I try not to beat myself up over it, but sometimes it's so bad where I can't even bring myself to do routine things, like go to work. I have to tell myself "you need money to pay for this apartment you're currently standing in". It makes me feel awful because it's such a normal thing, just going to work, but I feel like I have to really convince myself, or I won't go. Fortunately I can seem to force myself to shower every day, that's always a nice mood boost. I know how difficult the struggle is, I hope everyone in this thread is able to find some relief.

Hang in there, Naomi. There are tens of millions of us who can relate to exactly what you are saying. I know that it seems like an oversimplification, but its just biochemicals at work in your brain. Whatever biochemical mix you happen to have on hand at any given moment (assuming your receptors are functioning normally) controls your mood. People tell a depressed person that they don't have enough "guts" or enough "heart". Nonsense! It has nothing to do with willpower or desire. Your brain dictates your mood and we all have limited control over the moment to moment function of our brains. You are not lazy. That is another term that is commonly wrongly applied to those suffering from depression. You have a lack of motivation. Think of yourself as a car that is low on gas. Or even empty. A person can have all the willpower in the world and they still can not get a car with an empty gas tank to move.  A "lazy" person is someone who is not depressed, yet chooses to go the easy route out of luxury. Also, make no mistake...a good percentage of the public is walking around in the same situation. Do not feel strange or different. I hate to think of you suffering like that. If you care to share...is this a long term problem? Have you seen someone about it? Are you being medicated?  Regards, RM

Thank you for your thoughtful reply. Yes, I am fortunate enough to be receiving treatment as well as medication.  I know it's a long term thing to work on, but I have that innate desire for short term relief, you know?  I know that one day things will be better if I keep working on everything, that's what I hold onto.
So glad to hear that, Naomi. Nothing elevates those biochemical like hope. Hope that is grounded in reality, as yours is, is even more effective. And I know exactly what you mean about that desire for short term relief. I couldn't relate more. Take care.  RM
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#55
I have days like that alot. I have kind of an emergency routine that may seem trite, but helps me feel anew, refreshed, and able to take on the day. 

First. I take a shower and get a haircut. I buy a new shirt and clean my room. Minor changes, but changes I can make in the moment and do have a direct effect on my mood. Then I make a call, usually to a family member to check in and do it while I'm on a walk. Finally I do one minor thing that I've been putting off, like paying a bill or something. 

While these are all done with ease by others, sometimes they an appear to be monumental tasks. This simple routine pulls me out of my funk all the time. Best of luck! thanks for the thread. Hit close to home.
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#56
(01-09-2018, 03:42 AM)James Atherton Wrote: I have days like that alot. I have kind of an emergency routine that may seem trite, but helps me feel anew, refreshed, and able to take on the day. 

First. I take a shower and get a haircut. I buy a new shirt and clean my room. Minor changes, but changes I can make in the moment and do have a direct effect on my mood. Then I make a call, usually to a family member to check in and do it while I'm on a walk. Finally I do one minor thing that I've been putting off, like paying a bill or something. 

While these are all done with ease by others, sometimes they an appear to be monumental tasks. This simple routine pulls me out of my funk all the time. Best of luck! thanks for the thread. Hit close to home.

Having specific tasks you can turn to for a quick mood boost are great. Showering is definitely mine. Once I do that, I can usually be some level of productive that day. I definitely understand how seemingly normal tasks feel monumental. Keep up the great work and stay strong!
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#57
(01-09-2018, 05:52 AM)Naomi Wrote:
(01-09-2018, 03:42 AM)James Atherton Wrote: I have days like that alot. I have kind of an emergency routine that may seem trite, but helps me feel anew, refreshed, and able to take on the day. 

First. I take a shower and get a haircut. I buy a new shirt and clean my room. Minor changes, but changes I can make in the moment and do have a direct effect on my mood. Then I make a call, usually to a family member to check in and do it while I'm on a walk. Finally I do one minor thing that I've been putting off, like paying a bill or something. 

While these are all done with ease by others, sometimes they an appear to be monumental tasks. This simple routine pulls me out of my funk all the time. Best of luck! thanks for the thread. Hit close to home.

Having specific tasks you can turn to for a quick mood boost are great. Showering is definitely mine. Once I do that, I can usually be some level of productive that day. I definitely understand how seemingly normal tasks feel monumental. Keep up the great work and stay strong!

You too Naomi!  I think most people take for granted the difficulties one can face in the darkness of depression or anxiety and equally in those moments, we forget the little things that can pull us out and bring some pretty significant miracles. Peace be with you!
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#58
(08-31-2017, 12:37 PM)yellowdog Wrote: Hi

I am not depressed but I have days when I simply don't wish to get out of bed and only do so to feed my cat,  in only work 4 months a year.

The days when I don't work I struggle to get out of bed,  then I feel bad for my laziness.

in short,  is this laziness or depression.

It causes me distress as I wish I could jump out of bed and have motivation.

I do have things to do, I have hobbies, I volunteer at 2 places and always pop in on a neighbour.
I also have to take care an elderly parent.

my doctor says I am not depressed, and I don't fancy taking AD, but he did say that I could give them a try.

Anyone else relate?

Could be fibrobyalgia light depression of both they tend to merge into eatch other. I Have endured depsssion and GAD for many years however it use to take me months/weeks for me to regain back my energy after the depression went away. the point im getting to is that i have recently after at least 15 years of being treated with depression changed doctors and went to my doctors complaining of the same fateigue and and sore spots and mucle pains he imediately sent me for a whole bunch of blood tests in the mean time he tried me on various painkillers none worked but the tramadol. so he has sent me to the mental health team who also have a division that specialize in mucscle and joint problems especially MF. 
Take it easy. If i had to guess id say you have a very mild depression which triggers a stronger fibriomyalgia which is nothing tho be ashamed of Smile
once you can get a diagnosis you can make a plan to avoid it happening again
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#59
In a strange way it is comforting to know that other people have the same issues and struggles as I have - but I really do hope you all get out of your funk.

When my mood is better I always remind myself that I am not Lazy/ useless,  it is just my brain playing up.


The best advice i can give people is ROUTINE and do your best to prioritize things like self care.  It is more important you have a nice hot shower etc, than do a few home chores that can wait until your brain is better able to do them.

I had a productive day (for me)

I spend hours sorting/cleaning.  Then had a huge netflix binge,  now I am bathed and off to have dinner with my family.
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#60
Sounds good yellowdog.

Having a productive day.

Wishes of Many more for you.

Thank you for the thread.

Have a good evening.  Smile

 If you get tired, learn to rest, not to quit.
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