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Days when it is difficult to move? lazy? or depressed?
#11
Not bathing is a classic sign of depression. How's your appetite?
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#12
very poor, I once dropped to a BMI of 12, they gave me ensure, ran test etc.

I have NO interest in food but I do eat healthy and now have a BMI of 20.

I generally have to force myself to to say,

Right must shower etc today,

In the past I would do it without thinking of coaxing myself.

I try to find someplace to go everyday as that would MAKE be bath etc.

In short I just want my MOTIVATION back, I don't want to seen as lazy slob, but at times that is what I think of myself.

when I do go out in public and I plan to dress nicely put on make up etc.

I do think I maybe depressed maybe that why trams help me. if I don't take them everyday, when I do take them they give me motivation so maybe I do need SRRI. I have not told my GP this.

sometimes even Codeine give me motivation.
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#13
(09-03-2017, 05:45 PM)yellowdog Wrote: I'm kind of ashamed to admit this but at times I have not showered, bathed, brushed hair etc for a week, I feel to self councious to let anyone see me in a state.

I stick to by hobbies even though I no longer get so much enjoyment from them,

a girl in some other forum articulated so much better what she was going through and I could relate.

I think I do need to be less harsh and just focus on routine and small the stuff and keep on trying.

Thanks for all your responses.

I do need to sort my life out.

can anyone recommend any motivational youtube vids like the pale blue dot etc.

Bump.

For anyone that may have missed yellowdog's post. 

Hi yellowdog, I hope your day is okay.


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#14
Sounds like you have the right idea, you just need to execute the plan. Codeine, as you probably know is an Opiate so it will give you a mild energetic buzz. Before you go to the GP and jump on the SSRI rollercoaster, try and get yourself out of this rut.

Where are you from, YellowDog?
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#15
I am from the UK, the only psych dx I have is complex PTSD, which they said YEARS ago that I was not a suitable candidtate for therapy as I did not bond well with the therapist, so while I had 3 months of therapy many years ago, it did not help. I wanted to discuss day to day problems she wanted to discuss my childhood.

I think it is unfair to exclude me from mental health help as I did not get on well with the therapist.

I don't receive any mental health care and I am unlikely to.

Mental health Care in my area is appalling.
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#16
(09-04-2017, 02:47 PM)yellowdog Wrote: I am from the UK, the only psych dx I have is complex PTSD, which they said YEARS ago that I was not a suitable candidtate for therapy as I did not bond well with the therapist, so while I had 3 months of therapy many years ago, it did not help.  I wanted to discuss day to day problems she wanted to discuss my childhood.

I think it is unfair to exclude me from mental health help as I did not get on well with the therapist.

I don't receive any mental health care and I am unlikely to.

Mental health Care in my area is appalling.
It's appalling where I live too. You wait ages and go through the routine of Community Mental Health Nurse, then refered to CBT, Mindfulness, then Someone else. I got told by one Doctor "you arent crazy enough to see a Phychiatrist" What a state the NHS is in, especially regarding Mental Health. I armed myself with knowledge about Mental Health and got funny looks when I knew things the Doctors didn't. It's up to us to manage our Mental Health in this Country, because we sure as **** ain't going to get it from the NHS.
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#17
The Doors, do you live in my catchment area LOL! where I live you have to be really really in a bad state to get treatment.

MAD MAX, thank you for thinking about me and asking.

Today has not been so bad, I managed to have a bath as I am going out later, so I am dressed with hair and make up done, I even managed to get my eyebrow waxed, this sounds superficial but things like keeping my eyebrows in shape does help me.

What I want to ask is just how normal is it for people to have to coax themselves to brush teeth/hair shower leave the house to pick up milk etc.

I can recall the days when I just did those things on an automatic basis.

When I go back to the doctor I want to go there informed. I am not suicidal but I do think I need support to get my life back on track, I feel ashamed of myself a lot of the time. and it is this SHAME that forces me to things rather than automatically doing it.

So do " Normal" people, shower, eat well, clean house etc automatically or do they have to coax themselves or are compelled by an outside force? e,g having a cat means I have to take care of her and go to the shops for food, feed her etc. sticking to hobbies I no longer get much joy from means I take a bath and put on make up etc.

Some people buy clothes in a smaller size to motivate themselves to lose weight.
I buy nice clothes to motivate myself to make sure I go out and have a chance to use the clothes.

my internal dialogue is overwhelmed with my having to force myself to do basic self care,
from the outside it looks like I am doing OK, as I never show myself when I am in a state.
I worry that the short episodes of deep depression when I don't wash etc, will head to to longer states.
in short I just don't think it is normal for me to have to force myself to take care of myself.

I don't want to be fobbed off by my GP, if he says something like, " everybody has to will themselves to get out of bed , or everyone wants to have an extra hour in bed"

I hope this post makes sense?
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#18
Pleased that you that you're off out and it's given you the motivation to get ready. It's not superficial to want to look good. If only you could treat everyday as if you were going somewhere.

It makes perfect sense, YellowDog. Normal people do this day to day stuff automatically, without even having to think about them. When you are feeling down and motivation is lacking it's easy to let things slip.

Enjoy your night out, YellowDog,

TheDoors
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#19
Hi YellowDog.  Some good advice and even better posts in this thread!

I totally know what you mean about NO motivation.  Fortunately, I have a husband and a 16 yr old DD to motivate me.  The few times they have been out of town at the same town, showers were definitely optional, as well as most errands.  

I have completely been there.  Sometimes its like our bodies weigh a zillion pounds and it's just too hard to move.  

I have chronic pain of 13 years, but a few long stints before then.  Mentally I was always a bit angry.  Prozac and now Cymbalta help.  

Sorry for being so longwinded.  My advice is to first look for a physical cause for your lack of motivation, tiredness.  

I recently admitted I had hyperparathyroidism which causes lack of motivation, not feeling quite right, etc....  Solution is a simple surgery (if there is such a thing) and I am hopeful.  

Oh, the indicator for what I have is an elevated calcium level, just in case you have one.  

Hang in there Yellow Dog.  

Keep fighting the good fight,

Fire ;-)
Music is probably the only real magic I have encountered in my life. There's not some trick involved with it. It's pure and it's real. It moves, it heals, it communicates and does all these incredible things. Tom Petty
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#20
If you get hit by a car, or have a heart attack, the NHS is great. Unfortunately their resources for mental health are terribly limited, especially for anything complex that doesn't fit into a neat category. There are many types of mood disorders that affect quality of life e.g. dysthymia, but are not "typical" depression in the sense that GPs commonly recognise.

About 1/4 of appointments made with GPs are mental health issues, but unfortunately their training in psychology is quite limited. Some elect to study more, and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is a big thing for them, so some are good, but they are General Practitioners and not specialists.

Is paying for a one off private consultation with a clinical psychologist an option? I just wonder whether someone with more knowledge can steer your GP in the right direction? Otherwise get the ball rolling with your GP. A referral might take ages, but you may as well get in the queue. Even if the GP won't refer to a clinical psychologist, they might let you see a psychiatric nurse. They don't have as much training as a psychologist, but they know a lot more than the average GP. Most of the nurses I've met have been quite impressive. They tend to have a lot of practical experience.

In the UK a clinical psychologist will have a British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited general psychology BSc (3-4 years), then an MSc in clinical psychology (1-2 years), and finally a professional doctorate in clinical psychology (3-4 years). Often that is a PsychD - but some of the older ones will have gone the PhD route. That is a minimum of 7 years training - followed by at least 2 years of closely supervised work. You want to make sure they are a "Chartered Psychologist" since anyone can claim to be a psychologist, therapist, etc, but "Chartered" is a legally protected term. The BPS website has a section where you can search for or check the status of psychologists. "Chartered" definitely means a legit psychologist, although they can be chartered in other areas (e.g. educational psychology) that aren't likely to help you, so just make sure you get the right variety!

Aside from that, there are some good ideas for more immediate things you might do that sound sensible. Just going out for a walk every day might force you to keep up appearances.


Good luck
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