Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Telling people about being in "Recovery"
#11
(02-10-2016, 10:57 PM)BoomerB Wrote: Tommygun you hit the nail on the head. One of the founding fathers intended freedoms was the right to ingest what you want. Its common knowledge now that T Jefferson smoked hemp, and George Washington grew it at the very least

yes it is so messed up and backwards , why do you think we all are here? same reasons, we all have something in common in life and its not iops and I believe that
your only as old as the last time you changed your mind !
Reply
#12
Thomas Jefferson smoked hemp. that is funny
Reply
#13
Well i take a little historical liberty.... He damn sure cultivated it, and not at high enough amounts to do anything hemp-ish lol

INDUSTRIAL hemp-ish. This edit key is killing me the look of the posts gives me ocd
Reply
#14
The "freedom" issue is so interesting.  Theoretically, as an adult, I think should be able to legally partake in any substance I want, whether it poses a risk to my health or not.  I can drink myself to death, but not any other substance-its amazing logic.

I agree with you about NA Boomer B. After I got out of rehab, where it was drilled into our brains that subuxone/subutex was the devil, I went to an NA meeting. It was story after story about insane adventures and horrible consequences. I kept going for a month, before I realized I was beginning to hear the same things over and over. I think the sponsor system is helpful, but continuing to run a system of sobriety off an almost 80 year old text is foolish. After a month out of rehab, I went to a sub doctor and got started in the bupe program. I shared this in the last meeting I went to.  Even though I was already on suboxone at that point, because I felt it was smarter to have a deterrent (that didn't get me high) to using, since I was fresh out of rehab, people decided that I wasn't really sober or ready to commit, and all I got was one hell of a group lecture. All the while they were chugging coffee and chain-smoking cigarettes.

I ended up keeping up with a few of the nicer members of that group, and more than one is dead, with several others barely clinging on.  Meanwhile, I've had a couple of ups and downs in the past few years, but I've stayed on bupe and kept chugging along, opiate free for 3 years yesterday.  I've read about other countries, mostly in countries like Denmark and Norway, where addiction is looked at like a sliding scale.  Some people can't handle any substance ever, they will abuse it over and over.  Others can abstain from the ones they uncontrollably abuse and responsibly use others.  I can honestly say, without bupe and my prescribed anti-anxiety meds (that I have to hide from my sub doc) I don't know where I'd be.  But its the anti-anxiety meds that were essential to my moving on with my life, something I might not have been able to do if I was forced to live an all sober lifestyle.

Anyway, apologies for the rant, I just have a lot of issues with the Anon system. I know that was a bit off-topic, so I'll share more about what the main point of the thread is.  I've made errors in judgment, telling the wrong people about being clean, and then physically feeling the atmosphere of the conversation and relationship change.  I'm a student and self-employed right now, but I can imagine if I was in an office environment, it would not be something to be so open about.  People still judge you, despite the fact that their lifestyles are most likely more unhealthy than yours lol!
Reply
#15
(02-11-2016, 12:07 AM)BoomerB Wrote: NA people are the worst. Other than AA cuz they somehow think they're better. Lets see, i pawned my coin collection to cop vs i blacked out and killed a family of 4 driving on the wrong side of the highway. I hate "drug ppl" (ok peanut gallery i mean specific type of drug people- the ones who always have to top your story, lie so much that u hear 6 versions of 1 story over 10 days in the methadone line, always got the answer and will argue till death rather than admit they are wrong, and worst of all always want a cig... Basically someone who would never find this site). One of these people told me today with total faith that "all mail order benzos are fake right now". I happily sucked a Clonotril right in front of his sick ass. I'm sorry, I always worked to support my drug use so i have extreme issues with people who cash in foodstamps and hustle (in ways that hurt others. Collecting sxrap metals a hustle but not a hustle " run on" someone) My clon is fake? Gee thanks for the heads up call me in an hour if you need a tissue. Stupidity is forgivable, even something to help with, but ignorance... Is a quality posessed by those who deserve it. But AA/NA becomes the drug. People can't function without a meeting a day. And back to prejudice, the NA group refuses to recognize a successful methadone client as clean. I tried to come off it, slow tapered a year, and a year after i stopped was still sick... At that point i just realized it will be a life sentence and signed back up.
I felt the same when I was attended NA with my ex. I would go to support him. Then I found out that was where he was getting his new hookups. So frustrating. He was one of the ones who always had to tell what he did wrong and make the story into the biggest baddest story ever told. (When I know it wasn't) never understood why he wanted to be the worst/best drug dealer addict out there. My dad is the same way he's been sober 25 years but he attends those meetings like they are life support I'm glad they work for him I really am. I always wonder what will happen if he can't make a meeting 3 times a week or if he can't get to his Sunday morning pancake breakfast if he will relapse. I'm happy it works for people and am in no way putting it down but it always made me feel like it was a place to meet new friends to get a hookup. I guess my ex made that feeling for me. I wouldn't have been there if not to support him and ended up supporting his habits by driving him to the one place I would have never expected him to be getting high behind a building. Still makes me cry thinking about how dumb I was. How I didn't know... Anyways don't know why I just said all that. Happy Thursday! I'm really for the weekend!

Im glad I'm not the only one on a rant today. It's therapy just getting it out knowing there are friends listening!
~Be the Aloha you want to see in the world~
Reply
#16
Rehab is only as good as a you make it. I would tell anyone to go. How often does anyone get a month away from all the bs in their life to focus on just them and get an understanding of how and why we do the things you do. It is an educational vacation which can be one of the best experiences in your life without even realizing the profound impacts you can have on others around you. My D of choice was skiing, as it allowed me an escape from a marriage I was not happy with, from a world I didn't like and and a me I really couldn't stand. I knew I was going from the time i was 20. I always had that personality but only towards that "party favor". It was been just shy of 8 years and I left that behind. I found me.
AA, Na, Ca all serve their purpose. It gives people a way to get away from all
Of the other crap and into a social situation where they are with other people who understand what they are going through. I get it, but it was never my thing. I found
Going to the gym to be therapy enough.

Happy to discuss further
R
Reply
#17
^Yes, that's why sometimes if you're able to save some money, a yoga/meditation retreat is even better. At AA I feel that they really hammer into you that for the rest of your life "you're different" (they do make that clear with people counting the exact days they've been sober, even when it becomes decades). Many could probably see the problem of that sort of new fixation.

And yeah, it really sucks that being any *any* sort of recovery process (even the life-long kind (not to subtract from what I said earlier about AA though) is generally met with only superficial respect (or "gladness" from the bulk of people who are not as close to you) and neutral or cold "well about time" attitude from others...
Reply
#18
(01-22-2016, 12:04 AM)laizerfiest 2.0 Wrote: Wondered if anyone else had any thoughts about this.  I don't find it very intimidating telling people about being sober or going to rehab, much to the chagrin of my loved ones.  They try to be supportive, but I can definitely tell for my mom that it's a struggle not to view it as something to be shameful about.  I talked about it this morning in my acting for non-major's class in a discussion about motivations and how to call up different emotions and it really got me thinking about how everyone else that's in recovery feels about this. So please, pretend this is an AA or NA meeting and share lol!

Hi lazierfiest! I worked at a facility that treats addiction with an untraditional method. It's a 10 day outpatient treatment that uses a holistic approach. But the greatest healing comes from the unconditional love each client receives. No shame. No blame. Emphasis is on the fact that it is a disease not a moral flaw.  It's so encouraging that clients from every socio economic strata are open to videoing a testimonial for all to see. Being in recovery is a badge of honor!


It's never too late to be what you might have been.



Reply
#19
This is one of the hardest parts about recovery. I know my family is ashamed of me. The crazy part is they were my support when I got sober. It's been 4 years since I've been off a very heavy street drug. I couldn't tell you the exact date because it's not something I talk about or celebrate. I've been like "it's been 2 years since I've been off that stuff". Then I get "Yeah, that's good!" Not in a rude way but that's the end of the conversation. I'm very selective about people outside my family that I tell. I really need to make a determination if it's necessary at all to tell someone. It needs to be meaningful. I think I'm ashamed of what I was and I don't want people to know, which is hard because I'm proud of what I accomplished. It's crazy. I dunno.
Reply
#20
(11-07-2016, 06:20 AM)!mysterious503 Wrote: This is one of the hardest parts about recovery. I know my family is ashamed of me. The crazy part is they were my support when I got sober. It's been 4 years since I've been off a very heavy street drug. I couldn't tell you the exact date because it's not something I talk about or celebrate. I've been like "it's been 2 years since I've been off that stuff". Then I get "Yeah, that's good!" Not in a rude way but that's the end of the conversation. I'm very selective about people outside my family that I tell. I really need to make a determination if it's necessary at all to tell someone. It needs to be meaningful. I think I'm ashamed of what I was and I don't want people to know, which is hard because I'm proud of what I accomplished. It's crazy. I dunno.

It hurts my heart to see what you're going through. This is a time when you get to celebrate your strength, courage and determination to have broken free from a disease that had a strong grip on. Kudos my friend! Count each day as a VICTORY! You've earned it. You are not responsible for what others think, only what you think. Hold your head up high, and don't internalize any shame others feel. So many people have a preconceived notion of substance abuse as the dregs of society. It's all a part of the stigma. Surround yourself with others in recovery. A good support group whether it's a 12 step, Celebrate Recovery, Online Recovery Groups, will be there for you. The hardest part is to create those relationships and then picking up that phone when you're triggered. In time, you'll know instinctively who to share with. And, best of all, you will be there to support others as they navigate recovery and are going through what you went through.
You are a Hero! Let that in Heart


It's never too late to be what you might have been.



Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)